Outstanding new cut through artists who resonate most of all

There are no overnight sensations. It takes time to grow, to bloom and ignite something inside listeners. Artists however not on the marlbank radar properly beyond basic name recognition or even that prior to 2021 who certainly cut through and …

Published: 5 Oct 2021. Updated: 22 days.

There are no overnight sensations. It takes time to grow, to bloom and ignite something inside listeners. Artists however not on the marlbank radar properly beyond basic name recognition or even that prior to 2021 who certainly cut through and resonated most of all with your favourite daily jazz blog by hearing them on new records, live, or in some cases both are in healthy supply at the moment. We have pared a sampling list down to 10 of the finest. ''New?'' No, these artists haven't all just been born! What's here before you listen? Dazzling multi-instrumentalism from David Mrakpor whether on vibes, guitar or above all piano; brass ballsiness from Young Pilgrims; startling Nordic Cool School flavours from Maridalen; a gloriously fresh and piquant take on bossa nova and samba stylings from Mario Bakuna; a boffin-like guitar dexterity from Tom Ollendorff that lit a fuse; fabulous flow, freebop and beyond from saxist Guido Spannocchi; Toots-like calibre harmonica playing from Ariel Bart; classic-jazz vocals from Samara Joy; an anthemic acumen from Alexei Orechin; and extraordinary percussive rapport and timing courtesy of Minihi. Take a dip:

1 David Mrakpor of Blue Lab Beats

2 Young Pilgrims

3 Maridalen

4 Mario Bakuna

5 Tom Ollendorff

6 Guido Spannocchi

7 Ariel Bart

8 Samara Joy

9 Alexei Orechin

10 Minihi

Ariel Bart, above

Tags: News

The Kevin Brady Electric Quartet, Plan B, Ubuntu *****

Dave Redmond may be a secret ingredient hidden in plain sight. He's one of several. Redmond, little known beyond the tight knit tiny Irish jazz scene, proved himself the surprise factor too on George Colligan's Live in Arklow another Ubuntu release …

Published: 4 Oct 2021. Updated: 23 days.

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Dave Redmond may be a secret ingredient hidden in plain sight. He's one of several. Redmond, little known beyond the tight knit tiny Irish jazz scene, proved himself the surprise factor too on George Colligan's Live in Arklow another Ubuntu release that has a winning mix of American and Irish players and who also all really gelled.

Drummer Kevin Brady's studio record couldn't be more different to that formidable piano trio given idiomatically how different to Arklow it is. Far tougher bustling jazz-rock in complexion, more like the kind of thing you'd hear in the 1970s or later in the 80s and chargingly spearheaded by the Thelonious Monk Prize winning saxophonist Seamus Blake who say on 'Suicide Squeeze' is completely compelling. Bill Carrothers on Fender Rhodes electric piano provides balm on 'Quiet Beach' and much more but really it's the Brady and Blake floorshow in terms of sheer firepower which is an important part of the album's success.

Even when Blake goes all bruised romantic it's still salted through with edge and commitment that says dry your tears. To return to the starting point Redmond is agile and supremely beefy in support and the album has deep roots and the beat he lays down cannot be taken for granted. Final word the quality of the compositions (written alternately by Brady and by Carrothers) is outstanding. I'll certainly add Plan B to the next albums of the year update in a couple of months. That's a no-brainer as is its five-star rating. Out on Friday and streaming ahead of release on Bandcamp. Hear the band in Sligo town on 27 November when they play a theatre show at the Hawk's Well