5 top writers - selected

Our latest choice of 5 of the greatest writers to exhibit some relevance for a jazz readership - spanning magazines, the dailies, novels and poetry. Ranked counting down 5 Richard Brody When the venerable literary institution The New Yorker …

Published: 16 Jun 2022. Updated: 19 days.

Our latest choice of 5 of the greatest writers to exhibit some relevance for a jazz readership - spanning magazines, the dailies, novels and poetry. Ranked counting down

5 Richard Brody

When the venerable literary institution The New Yorker publishes a Richard Brody article you know it is a special day

4 Mike Hobart

Best, certainly kindest (and that's OK), jazz live reviewer among the veteran London scene jazz hacks Mike Hobart's words always sing off the page. This ex-Howlin' Wilf (James Hunter) saxophonist on the side is bafflingly still unaward-winning

3 Geoff Dyer

Even if it's not about jazz, not a backhand compliment either pun intended given his new Roger Federer book, Dyer takes us higher

2 Lionel Shriver

Even when she goes too far. A born provocateur and remember that when you reach for the green ink or consider cancelling her. Shriver's very contrary high wire act wit challenges your dearest most liberal certainties to peel these away to the bone. Begin with 'Jazz is dominated by men. So what?' Not for the faint-hearted

1 Anthony Joseph

Kitch was excellent and Sonnets for Albert is out now. A literary and musical polymath Anthony is at Cafe Oto with Hannah Silva and Jason Yarde next Thursday

Anthony Joseph, top. Photo: Serious

Donate

Tags:

Mike Soper, Starlings ****

Track of the day: 'Starlings' is drawn from the Laura Jurd produced sooper dooper Mike Soper quartet studio album Undoing out next month that marks the incredible debut of the trumpeter. For his appealingly edgy sound think Peter Evans of Mostly …

Published: 16 Jun 2022. Updated: 19 days.

Next post

Track of the day: 'Starlings' is drawn from the Laura Jurd produced sooper dooper Mike Soper quartet studio album Undoing out next month that marks the incredible debut of the trumpeter. For his appealingly edgy sound think Peter Evans of Mostly Other People Do The Killing renown. Bass guitar here is important and the work of old Elliot Galvin Dreamland mucker Tom McCredie found here lolloping around agreeably in the undergrowth with Galvin head bobbingly as zany as Django in the erstwhile Beckenhamite's considerable Zawinul-esque pomp. Drummer Jay Davis delivers an off-kilter curveball or three behind the beat as part of the polyrhythmical stew while Elliott quaintly decorative at the end has the final epigrammatical, playful, word on synth using an earlier sub-plot of a motif suitably disinterred for our lasting edification.

Donate