Among the jazz artists nominated for the 2022 Grammys Jon Batiste dominates across multiple genre categories

Nominations for the 64th Grammys were announced earlier direct from the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles. There are 88 categories! Jon Batiste picked up some 11 nominations across numerous genre categorisations. Also nominated: Kurt Elling, Tony …

Published: 23 Nov 2021. Updated: 10 days.

jb

Nominations for the 64th Grammys were announced earlier direct from the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles. There are 88 categories! Jon Batiste picked up some 11 nominations across numerous genre categorisations. Also nominated: Kurt Elling, Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga, Terence Blanchard and Lyle Mays

Jazz-related nominees include:

In Record of the Year

“Freedom” — Jon Batiste — Jon Batiste, Kizzo & Autumn Rowe, producers; Russ Elevado, Kizzo & Manny Marroquin, engineers/mixers; Michelle Mancini, mastering engineer

“I Get a Kick Out of You” — Tony Bennett & Lady Gaga — Dae Bennett, producer; Dae Bennett & Josh Coleman, engineers/mixers; Greg Calbi & Steve Fallone, mastering engineers

Album of the Year

We Are — Jon Batiste — Craig Adams, David Gauthier, Braedon Gautier, Brennon Gautier, Gospel Soul Children Choir, Hot 8 Brass Band, PJ Morton, Autumn Rowe, Zadie Smith, St. Augustine High School Marching 100 & Trombone Shorty, featured artists; Jon Batiste, Mickey Freedom Hart, King Garbage, Kizzo, Sunny Levine, Nate Mercereau, David Pimentel, Ricky Reed, Autumn Rowe, Jahaan Sweet & Nick Waterhouse, producers; Jon Batiste, Russ Elevado, Mischa Kachkachishvili, Kizzo, Joseph Lorge, Manny Marroquin, David Pimentel, Ricky Reed, Jaclyn Sanchez, Matt Vertere, Marc Whitmore & Alex Williams, engineers/mixers; Andrae Alexander, Troy Andrews, Jon Batiste, Zach Cooper, Vic Dimotsis, Eric Frederic, Kizzo, Sunny Levine, Steve McEwan, PJ Morton, Autumn Rowe & Mavis Staples, songwriters; Michelle Mancini, mastering engineer

Love for Sale — Tony Bennett And Lady Gaga — Dae Bennett, producer; Dae Bennett, Josh Coleman & Billy Cumella, engineers/mixers; Greg Calbi & Steve Fallone, mastering engineers

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance

“I Get a Kick Out of You,” Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

“Love for Sale,” Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga

“’Til We Meet Again (Live),” Norah Jones

“Ledisi Sings Nina,” Ledisi

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album

“Double Dealin’” — Randy Brecker And Eric Marienthal

“The Garden” — Rachel Eckroth

“Tree Falls” — Taylor Eigsti

“At Blue Note Tokyo” — Steve Gadd Band

“Deep: The Baritone Sessions, Vol. 2” — Mark Lettieri

Best Traditional R&B Performance

“I Need You,” Jon Batiste

“Born Again,” Leon Bridges featuring Robert Glasper

Best Progressive R&B Album

“Something to Say,” Cory Henry

“Mood Valiant,” Hiatus Kaiyote

“Dinner Party: Dessert,” Terrace Martin, Robert Glasper, 9th Wonder and Kamasi Washington

Best R&B Song

“Good Days,” Jacob Collier, Carter Lang, Carlos Munoz, Solána Rowe and Christopher Ruelas, songwriters (SZA)

Best R&B Album

We Are, Jon Batiste

Gold-Diggers Sound, Leon Bridges

Best Jazz Vocal Album

“Generations,” The Baylor Project

“Superblue,” Kurt Elling and Charlie Hunter

“Time Traveler,” Nnenna Freelon

“Flor,” Gretchen Parlato

“Songwrights Apothecary Lab,” Esperanza Spalding

Best Improvised Jazz Solo

“Sackodougou,” Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, soloist

“Kick Those Feet,” Kenny Barron, soloist

“Bigger Than Us,” Jon Batiste, soloist

“Absence,” Terence Blanchard, soloist

“Humpty Dumpty (Set 2),” Chick Corea, soloist

Best Jazz Instrumental Album

“Jazz Selections: Music From and Inspired by Soul,” Jon Batiste

“Absence,” Terence Blanchard featuring the E Collective and the Turtle Island Quartet

“Skyline,” Ron Carter, Jack DeJohnette and Gonzalo Rubalcaba

“Akoustic Band Live,” Chick Corea, John Patitucci and Dave Weckl

“Side-Eye NYC (V1.IV),” Pat Metheny

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album

“Live at Birdland!,” The Count Basie Orchestra directed by Scotty Barnhart

“Dear Love,” Jazzmeia Horn and her Noble Force

“For Jimmy, Wes AND Oliver,” Christian McBride Big Band

“Swirling,” Sun Ra Arkestra

“Jackets XL,” Yellowjackets + WDR Big Band

Best Latin Jazz Album

“Mirror Mirror,” Eliane Elias With Chick Corea and Chucho Valdés

“The South Bronx Story,” Carlos Henriquez

“Virtual Birdland,” Arturo O’Farrill & the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra

“Transparency,” Dafnis Prieto Sextet

“El Arte Del Bolero,” Miguel Zenón and Luis Perdomo

Best Tropical Latin Album

“Salswing!,” Rubén Blades y Roberto Delgado & Orquesta

Best American Roots Performance

“Cry,” Jon Batiste

Best American Roots Song

“Cry,” Jon Batiste and Steve McEwan, songwriters (Jon Batiste)

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media

“Bridgerton,” Kris Bowers, composer

“Soul,” Jon Batiste, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, composers

Best Instrumental Composition

“Beautiful is Black,” Brandee Younger, composer (Brandee Younger)

“Concerto for Orchestra: Finale,” Vince Mendoza, composer (Vince Mendoza and Czech National Symphony Orchestra featuring Antonio Sánchez and Derrick Hodge)

“Dreaming In Lions: Dreaming In Lions,” Arturo O’farrill, composer (Arturo O’farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Ensemble)

“Eberhard,” Lyle Mays, composer (Lyle Mays)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella

“Chopsticks,” Bill O’Connell, arranger (Richard Baratta)

“The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire),” Jacob Collier, Arranger (Jacob Collier)

“To The Edge Of Longing (Edit Version),” Vince Mendoza, Arranger (Vince Mendoza, Czech National Symphony Orchestra and Julia Bullock)

Best Album Notes

“The Complete Louis Armstrong Columbia and RCA Victor Studio Sessions 1946-1966,” Ricky Riccardi, album notes writer (Louis Armstrong)

Best Classical Compendium

“Plays,” Chick Corea. Chick Corea and Birnie Kirsh, producers

Best Contemporary Classical Composition

“Batiste: Movement 11,” Jon Batiste, composer (Jon Batiste)

Best Music Video

“Freedom,” (Jon Batiste); Alan Ferguson, video director; Alex P. Willson, video producer.

“I Get a Kick Out of You,” (Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga); Jennifer Lebeau, video director; Danny Bennett, Bobby Campbell and Jennifer Lebeau, video producers.

Jon Batiste, top

The full list of all nominees is on the Grammy website

Tags: News

Unknown to Known, Portico, (EP) Own label ****

Need to know? For sure. While only an EP in terms of length not much post-production has gone into it (it could do with proper mastering) nonetheless Portico is very impressive. Recorded at Portico Gallery in West Norwood, south London, hence the …

Published: 23 Nov 2021. Updated: 10 days.

Next post

KTU

Need to know? For sure. While only an EP in terms of length not much post-production has gone into it (it could do with proper mastering) nonetheless Portico is very impressive. Recorded at Portico Gallery in West Norwood, south London, hence the name, the recording features the bassist that we here at marlbank have appreciated most live this year Jihad Darwish whose eclecticism continues to engage and stimulate and is significant in the ensemble sound. Unknown to Known are very fresh and join the dots between free improv and a modernistic chamber sound dotted with intimations of Indo-fusion in a very unmannered and involving style.

This is ''free improv'' in a very different sense to the ''plinky-plonky'' school often identified with it in a classic London sense ie via the Mopomoso or Beresfordian schools or the complementary full throttle Evan Parker sound. In other words it's not Cagian, full-on Aylerian freak-out or anything like that and while still ''free''-sounding has more of an affinity to when Zakir Hussain collaborates with Dave Holland and Chris Potter certainly in terms of open creative feel and the sense of an improvisational journey throughout.

On the prior occasions coming across Darwish the bassist wasn't playing in such a free environment as this. But certainly this context suits him very well moving far away from more orthodox bebop or the blues when heard before with Guido Spanocchi and Marcus Bonfanti respectively.

Comprising four improvisations spearheaded by reeds, it's Yusuf Ahmed on drums and percussion who is excellent. He's touring with Joy Crookes whose Skin this year was a blinding revelation. Ahmed comes into his own chopping into an Indo-fusion domain on the fourth of these improvisations, sax chipping away and a head-bobbing momentum developing as Darwish's beat dances around. Tamar Osborn known for her work with Sarathy Korwar contributes baritone saxophone and clarinet most effectively and intertwines with Soothsayers saxist Idris (brother of Courtney Pine pianist Zoe) Rahman while Darwish deftly provides locomotion on bass guitar on the second improvision. ''Unknown'' to ''known''? Self- prophesying it's true. But why ever not on this remarkable evidence for starters. Wicked live, surely, they must be – this statement of intent strongly suggests. Stephen Graham

Yusuf Ahmed, top left, Tamar Osborn, Jihad Darwish, Idris Rahman. Photo: Unknown to Known Bandcamp page