Chihei Hatakeyama listening

Hugely prolific Chihei Hatakeyama has released dozens of albums since 2006. Listening to 'Sound of Air' from Late Spring to be issued in April is an unusual experience. There is quite a width of sound. However, there really is no content to grab on …

Published: 16 Feb 2021. Updated: 20 days.

Hugely prolific Chihei Hatakeyama has released dozens of albums since 2006. Listening to 'Sound of Air' from Late Spring to be issued in April is an unusual experience. There is quite a width of sound. However, there really is no content to grab on to apart from swells and decay, swells and decay. That width, duly noted. Can you grab on to dynamic effects? An album that was more than 2 years in the making, deem all this soundscapery? No, it's better than that. Issuing label Gearbox have come a long way since begining in the early days by putting out for instance poke-your-ears-out quality sounding Tubby Hayes recordings from the archives on vinyl only. For a musician such as Hatakeyama who multi-tracks electric guitar, acoustic guitar, sound effect, modular synth and much more this is a galaxy away from mountain ranges of ''little giants'' who blow in the back rooms of pubs. Pity really because that sound still counts more than we all know, the mantle now taken up by the Jazz in Britain label picking up the slack. Yet what's here is a sophisticated lead-off track nonetheless although it seems as if it appears on the wrong label really to make sense of where its heart really resides. Maybe Gearbox will continue their transformation ongoing since the much more jazz-relevant Chiminyo album I Am Panda and in a few years the release might fit in if the plan is even more to be electronica etc R us. SG

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Love Music and it Will Love You Back: Essays on Music by Jeff Colella

'Playing from memory is like taking a mirror to our learning process. It is where we find out just how thorough that process has been. It represents the culmination of our learning. 'I have a proposition for you. What if instead of saying ''I’m …

Published: 16 Feb 2021. Updated: 20 days.

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'Playing from memory is like taking a mirror to our learning process. It is where we find out just how thorough that process has been. It represents the culmination of our learning.

'I have a proposition for you. What if instead of saying ''I’m going to learn to play this piece or tune”, we said “I’m going to internalize this music”? For me the word internalize is more visceral, the word learning more intellectual. (Visceral as defined in the dictionary relates to deep inward feelings rather than to intellect.)'

The above quotation from the 'Memorization' chapter of the e-book is what I gained most from reading Love Music and It Will Love You Back written by the distinguished erstwhile Lou Rawls pianist and session player Jeff Colella. Not a massive tome but there are quite a few pearls of wisdom contained within its pages and the above is only a small example. Love Music operates on two levels: as a kind of pep talk for musicians and teachers first and foremost. But anyone into music appreciation will also gain things out of it on a general level in the encouraging of the need to bypass paralysis through analysis and move more into a different headspace. Colella is good on interpretation and not getting too derailed by logic. Yet he is insistent about things such as knowing your tune themes, what voicing actually is, and above all immersing yourself in the process of improvisation through deep consideration. The more detailed chordal discussion however is really more for pianists. The Colella tone is friendly. Don't worry about a few typos here and there. Internalising is the biggest takeaway. Thinking and then doing is instead in its pages core. SG. mymusicmasterclass.com