Being

What's new in the world of the piano trio? Being released a few days ago is. Not a difficult listen, it's quite light in some ways and very accessible but does not dumb down. Norwegian pianist Eyolf Dale is a virtuoso and this is very much the …

Published: 8 Feb 2021. Updated: 7 months.

What's new in the world of the piano trio? Being released a few days ago is. Not a difficult listen, it's quite light in some ways and very accessible but does not dumb down. Norwegian pianist Eyolf Dale is a virtuoso and this is very much the leader's record rather than the band's or so it seems until you venture further in. Landing in chamber-jazz containing a slightly optimistic air (for instance on 'Northern Brewer') the sound should appeal to anyone into the Swede Jan Lundgren. 'Behind 315' however is darker and more experimental and where Being gets more interesting. My admiration for the record increased the more I listened but I still am not blown away. With Dale are Per Zanussi on double bass + reliably ethereal saw; and Audun Kleive – on drums. Pick of the tracks? 'The Pondering.' On Edition

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Is jazz boring? Deciphering the Chaplin conundrum: the view from the terraces

Oh simple thing, where have you gone? I'm getting old and I need something to rely on. So tell me when you're gonna let me in, I'm getting tired and I need somewhere to begin. One of the biggest criticisms of jazz levelled at this great music is …

Published: 8 Feb 2021. Updated: 7 months.

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Oh simple thing, where have you gone? I'm getting old and I need something to rely on. So tell me when you're gonna let me in, I'm getting tired and I need somewhere to begin.

One of the biggest criticisms of jazz levelled at this great music is that it is boring. Such barbs bandied about often revolve around the perceived presence of too many chords or the ever vexatious ''noodling'' issue. But more, push comes to shove, land eventually on discussions around repertoire.

Let's call this for the sake of simplicity the Chaplin conundrum, that tendency to cover Charlie Chaplin's 'Smile' rather than opt to reprise the artist who is Tom Chaplin. Like a lot of standards 'Smile' is dull to some as too are Keane, pride of Battle; to others the greatest thing since breathing. Full ''boring'' disclosure I like the song. I also like Keane. Yet Keane were part of the ''new boring''. Fact remains however, detractors out there feel free to hurl mud, Keane delivered one or two amazing songs that stand the test of time and still have the capacity to engage the brain. 'Smile' also activates parts of the imagination that you never even knew were there. Inconvenient truths spurred on by art is boring, to some.

I was in a deserted shopping centre earlier today down by the river browsing in the fine wines section and heard Keane boom down the PA while loitering in an adjacent mini-aisle contemplating drafting in schnapps for an alternative quaff.

Rousing from my stupor as Big Tom C. rose to his theme, ideas began to circulate. I got to thinking: What's boring about jazz from the point of view of a superfan hearing 'Smile'? Nothing! What's boring about jazz, how the non-fan hears it? Everything! You can't square that circle. Music is about being passionate and another reason why specialist jazz blogs are vital. Think of reading about jazz in the general music press as if it is akin to supporting a football team. Make the mistake to stand in the opposition's terraces while still sporting your beloved team's colours: How's that going to go? Charlie Chaplin, writer of 'Smile,' top