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Graham Costello, Impetu ****

All three tracks heard so far from the Darrel Sheinman and Hugh Padgham produced Second Lives are invigorating. But is that enough? That's an easy yes. 'Impetu' the 7th of the 11 tracks (the album itself is not released until 7 May) has drummer …

Published: 15 Apr 2021. Updated: 22 days.

All three tracks heard so far from the Darrel Sheinman and Hugh Padgham produced Second Lives are invigorating. But is that enough?

That's an easy yes. 'Impetu' the 7th of the 11 tracks (the album itself is not released until 7 May) has drummer Graham Costello opening up the tune. The band then concern themselves with building up to something that remains indiscernible for quite a stretch. It's a big tease.

The recorded bass end of the sound spectrum and the recorded sound quality is first class (Lalo Schifrin-like fundamentally in this detail) and is very beefy and incredibly well recorded for clarity certainly and a certain visceral push to its momentum.

So the build up then resolves itself eventually. It is Liam Shortall on trombone who provides the ecstasy of release. Extremely nicely written by Costello 'Impetu' is definitely worth going the extra mile to seek this one out. Costello has the potential to be a very big name on the wider scene beyond Scotland before too long surely. His drum sound reminds me of Lammas period Mark Fletcher a bit. Just factor in a big dollop of luck to let that happen but what's on Second Lives in its looseness and open feel so far works like a charm.

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Infinite riches in a little room: solo Neset soon

What gleams like tinsel is but for the moment. What's true remains intact for future days. Goethe, Faust, Part One, 1808 The greatest living jazz musician to hail from the continent of Europe we think is the saxophonist Jan Garbarek. We'd justify …

Published: 15 Apr 2021. Updated: 22 days.

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What gleams like tinsel is but for the moment. What's true remains intact for future days.

Goethe, Faust, Part One, 1808

The greatest living jazz musician to hail from the continent of Europe we think is the saxophonist Jan Garbarek. We'd justify that in terms of his significant achievement over decades, Garbarek long since globally known as a recording and touring artist and improviser of character and individuality. Long story stort he was a member of the historic Keith Jarrett Belonging band, otherwise known as the European Quartet, active between 1974 and 1979, and creator of cherished albums of his own to name just a few chiefly Afric Pepperbird and, with the Hilliard Ensemble, Officium. No one in Europe since the days of Django Reinhardt (1910-1953) has come close in achieving what Garbarek has accomplished in terms of individualism as a composer and improviser. In terms of saxophone artistry it is natural to look around and wonder are there any players from Norway, or anywhere for that matter within all Europe, who come close? There are (Courtney Pine, Evan Parker, Shabaka Hutchings for starters). The early signs, and remember Garbarek is more than double his age, include his fellow countryman Marius Neset. Championed early on by Django Bates Neset's records include our favourite to date the scintillating Birds. His latest introduced by 'Brighter Times' – the solo Neset – from A New Dawn (ACT) is looking like a further revelation in Neset's remarkable career to date. This time the focus is on sheer instrumentalism up close and personal. Out on 30 April. Marius Neset, top, photo: ACT