Hear the absolutely vital lead-off track from Artlessly Falling featuring Robert Wyatt guesting with Mary Halvorson's Codegirl

A jazz guitar great who emerged from an art-jazz space Mary Halvorson features the iconic Robert Wyatt in addition to 'The Lemon Trees' on two more tracks from this soon to be released Code Girl album Artlessly Falling. Halvorson has already paid …

Published: 2 Oct 2020. Updated: 16 days.

A jazz guitar great who emerged from an art-jazz space Mary Halvorson features the iconic Robert Wyatt in addition to 'The Lemon Trees' on two more tracks from this soon to be released Code Girl album Artlessly Falling. Halvorson has already paid tribute to the widely adored Soft Machine and Matching Mole legend on an earlier album Illusionary Sea arranging the Wyatt/Catherine classic, 'Maryan'. This goes one step further with the presence of Wyatt himself. 'The Lemon Trees' lyric is colour laden and finds Wyatt conjuring ''indolent visions'' his unmistakable voice embellished gently by seraphic backing. Excellent trumpet on the track by Adam O'Farrill by the way, the track allows a lot of room for an open sense of improvisation that Code Girl imaginatively explore.

Mary Halvorson pictured. Photo: via Bandcamp. The track is on the Firehouse 12 label.

Tags: Best so far in 2020NewsTracks

Alan Broadbent trio, Trio in Motion

A swinging optimistic start to Trio in Motion on 'Wonder Why,' one of the great jazz pianists showing his interpretative elegance. Alan Broadbent is with his New York Notes trio of bassist Harvie S. and drummer Billy Mintz. Mintz swings hard on …

Published: 1 Oct 2020. Updated: 19 days.

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A swinging optimistic start to Trio in Motion on 'Wonder Why,' one of the great jazz pianists showing his interpretative elegance. Alan Broadbent is with his New York Notes trio of bassist Harvie S. and drummer Billy Mintz.

Mintz swings hard on 'Lennie's Pennies' and Harvie S. thumps out his line. It is pretty effective and gives the trio almost a graphic edge. 'Struttin' with Some Barbecue' has a lovely sunny feel once again and sense it on this record that Broadbent is content and happy without being too sentimental or wallowing in the past. The record speaks not of the typically contemporary jazz of 2020 by any means, however, so you might think wrongly that it sounds too much of an overbearing period piece. It is true regardless that Broadbent can see a long way down the road.

Far more ''American sounding'' than some albums that hail from America, if you are into George Shearing you will like this record even if Broadbent has a different sound to the Battersea master that collects together a number of approaches and patches them like a beautifully decorative quilt. A little Erroll Garner, although some might say Dave Brubeck's influence is in there too, certainly on the Paul Desmond tune 'Late Lament', is evident.

Into the blue Broadbent knows the trick of making laughter sound like crying. He somehow communes with past masters like dancers in the dark, Broadbent long ago became his own man and his arranging is as well known, even more so, than all this immaculate playing. It's glass half full, and a pleasure to imbibe. Out now on Savant.