Ingrid Laubrock, Aki Takase, Kasumi, Intakt ***1/2

An engrossing collaboration where tension gives way to release, thought to wild abandon. Ingrid Laubrock alternates between tenor and soprano saxophones and Aki Takase on piano deliver improvisations that are as concise in length as they are filled …

Published: 3 Nov 2019. Updated: 11 months.

An engrossing collaboration where tension gives way to release, thought to wild abandon.

Ingrid Laubrock alternates between tenor and soprano saxophones and Aki Takase on piano deliver improvisations that are as concise in length as they are filled with ideas.

Opening with the title track: the mood is thoughtful yet precise. In their art music Laubrock is a darting, involving presence.

Clearly a rapport is established on a deep level with Takase throughout. The tracks are however a little samey in their essential idea of co-operation my only caveat.

Nevertheless there is plenty here to reward active listening. Laubrock has become one of the world's great saxophonists and proves her mastery yet again and Takase should be much better known beyond the cognoscenti given her deft conception of rhythm and the way she punctuates her accompaniment. Certainly, even while bearing in mind the album's lack of variety, Kasumi accelerates the possibility of that trajectory becoming a distinct reality. SG.

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track of the day: Mojave

From Dust (Sunnyside, 15 November release) by the Mat Maneri quartet, the violist Maneri plus Lucian Ban (p), John Hébert (b) and Randy Peterson, (d). The label notes: ''The compositions are mostly Maneri originals with Ban adding a couple of his …

Published: 3 Nov 2019. Updated: 11 months.

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From Dust (Sunnyside, 15 November release) by the Mat Maneri quartet, the violist Maneri plus Lucian Ban (p), John Hébert (b) and Randy Peterson, (d).

The label notes: ''The compositions are mostly Maneri originals with Ban adding a couple of his own.''

Maneri opens the track plangently, Ban falteringly accompanying behind him while Peterson uses brushes and Hébert maintains a slow beat. A quiet elegy in which Maneri shows how he can manipulate timbre and mood and by bluesy smears and slides teases the melody into open space.

Dust also includes a tribute to Paul Motian.

photo of Mat Maneri: Wikipedia