Daily jazz blog, Marlbank

Introducing Caili O'Doherty

If you appreciate both the relative modernism in the pianism of Sarah Tandy and a long trek away the contrasting tradster vocabulary of Champian Fulton you will very possibly dig US pianist Caili O'Doherty whose accessible get-down Quarantine Dream …

Published: 2 Jun 2022. Updated: 2 years.

If you appreciate both the relative modernism in the pianism of Sarah Tandy and a long trek away the contrasting tradster vocabulary of Champian Fulton you will very possibly dig US pianist Caili O'Doherty whose accessible get-down Quarantine Dream is out soon on the straightahead Posi-Tone label and whose own sound lands somewhere slap, bang in the middle of all the above while forging ahead and not omitting to deliver a route-to-the-roots of classic riff and groove-drenched bluesiness. Saxophonist Nicole Glover is Joshua Redman-like, another big plus factor here for the feel goodness that circulates and transmits. Several tracks of this quartet studio album (bassist Tamir Shmerling and drummer Cory Cox complete the line-up) are streaming ahead of next week's full album release. Clearly Caili has a calling. Listen in natural response. SG

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Enrico Pieranunzi quintet, The Extra Something, CAM Jazz ****

A second release recently from Italian piano master Enrico Pieranunzi and not a trio this time recorded over two nights live six years ago at the greatest jazz club in the world, the Village Vanguard in New York. The things we take away from this …

Published: 2 Jun 2022. Updated: 2 years.

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A second release recently from Italian piano master Enrico Pieranunzi and not a trio this time recorded over two nights live six years ago at the greatest jazz club in the world, the Village Vanguard in New York. The things we take away from this are once again how formidable a player Seamus Blake is (especially on the title track) and also how perkily and positively the rhythmical undertow (the mood often landing in an AfroCuban feel) develops. Drummer Adam Cruz knits very well with his erstwhile Danilo Pérez trio comrade Ben Street and for the most exuberant sections of the record trumpet/flugel player Diego Urcola adds a certain joy. Pieranunzi plays in a very ego-less way and yet shows often how formidable a forceful comper he is as a key factor within his compelling style and individuality. 'Entropy' is when you can really hear him at his best. One mystery is that there is no trombone player listed on this track by the label on its website and trombone resounds elsewhere dotted around the record (it could be Urcola switching instrument as he also is known to play trombone). The Ornettian 'Five Plus Five' is a delight at the end. For a record full of spirit look no further, you have arrived at that longed-for destination.