Jeff Parker ETA IVtet, Mondays at The Enfield Tennis Academy, Eremite ****

ETA as in a Los Angeles bar - the letters standing for the Enfield Tennis Academy. The bar is a homage to David Foster Wallace. Live album of the year? Yes, up there in drastically more casual but no less serious circumstances along with the Wayne …

Published: 2 Nov 2022. Updated: 33 days.

ETA as in a Los Angeles bar - the letters standing for the Enfield Tennis Academy. The bar is a homage to David Foster Wallace. Live album of the year? Yes, up there in drastically more casual but no less serious circumstances along with the Wayne Shorter Detroit album referred to here and the spectacular upcoming Soweto LSO epic White Juju. Tortoise guitar genius Jeff Parker is here with Suite For Max Brown saxophonist Josh Johnson, bassist Anna Butterss and drummer Jay Bellerose who was on Solomon Burke late period masterpiece Don't Give Up On Me.

Drill into Van Morrison's 'Fast Train' for Bellerose's stellar touch on the Burke album. Here not so much by contrast but in a parallel universe Bellerose who is very important on Mondays at The Enfield Tennis Academy is in hypnotic listening mode touching the kit when it makes elemental sense, not minimalist at all, just necessary even Gadd-like in the overall gravity of time and role. Parker's playing wisdom is profound, the timing and subtlety exquisite as is his scalar resource. The complete recordings made at the ETA add up to 10 hours apparently. More please.

Jeff Parker plays the Black Box in Belfast tonight

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Avram Fefer, Juba Lee, Clean Feed ****

The fabulous Pleonid (2017) was the last time saxophonist Avram Fefer was on our radar. It is no reflection on the prolific and stimulating avant saxophonist but maybe an indication how territorial jazz appreciation can be when a leading light from …

Published: 2 Nov 2022. Updated: 35 days.

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The fabulous Pleonid (2017) was the last time saxophonist Avram Fefer was on our radar. It is no reflection on the prolific and stimulating avant saxophonist but maybe an indication how territorial jazz appreciation can be when a leading light from a particular scene even a US one is pretty much little-known beyond even among specialist listeners.

Not so guitarist Marc Ribot famed for his work with Tom Waits and Eric Revis, from the Branford Marsalis Quartet one of the greatest jazz groups of the last 30 years particularly when Tain was still in the band, on this gem of an album the title track of which is streaming. A case once again of the democracy of the music when leaders become side players when the situation is right. Old news.

Completed by drummer Chad Taylor - begin if new to the quartet with Testament put out in 2019. Taylor thinking further back was magnificent in 2011 heard live at London's Bishopsgate over the road from Liverpool Street station playing Ayler in Ribot's trio with Henry Grimes.

On Juba Lee Fefer is on tenor and on bass clarinet and brings a righteous frisson and blues connotation throughout. Highlights include a new version of Fefer's Abdullah Ibrahim tribute 'Brother Ibrahim' that appeared in a different guise on 2004's Shades of the Muse. There's a sense of freedom throughout this fine album that simply can't be commodified which elsewhere is a faultline within a lot of contemporary jazz when cats do the right thing often for the wrong reason. There is no such bad faith anywhere here one of the reasons why it gets you deep within.

Avram Fefer photo: Clara Pereira

Out on 18 November