Jo Berger Myhre, Unheimlich Manoeuvre, RareNoise ****

Quite a dark album. There's also tension, suspense, a sense of moving beauty and a vision all as one. Norwegian bassist Myhre who was on Nils Petter Molvær's fine album Buoyancy has guitarist Jo David Meyer Lysne, pianist Jana Anisimova, …

Published: 22 Sep 2021. Updated: 35 days.

Quite a dark album. There's also tension, suspense, a sense of moving beauty and a vision all as one. Norwegian bassist Myhre who was on Nils Petter Molvær's fine album Buoyancy has guitarist Jo David Meyer Lysne, pianist Jana Anisimova, keyboardist Morten Qvenild and on the Iranian goblet drum the tombak, a significant part of the sound in places, Kaveh Mahmudiyan, among the personnel. Compositions are by Myhre. The album uses spoken word text from Raymond Carver's 'I Could See the Smallest Things' one sign of an auteur's touch at play and not at all clunkily deployed. Head to 'Cynosure' for a clue as to how Unheimlich Manoeuvre uses space to its advantage best of all without being clinical.

There is a middle-eastern texture, a tangential relationship to electronica (not a useful term really but there isn't one that's perfect as a catch-all) and jazz (ditto) although most listeners who come to this record will be from a progressively-open jazz listener background deep down. The solo arco bass lines at the beginning of 'Peril' and the bass throb at the get-go of 'Inner Relations' are highlights. And yet this is very much a wide compositional statement and long-play listen beyond the individual moments of, yes, bliss. The invasive slap and tingle of the pulsing 'Aviary' blow us away. Out on Friday

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Previously unreleased and earliest known Sheila Jordan recording Comes Love Lost Session 1960 paints a vivid picture

A highly mysterious Sheila Jordan studio recording has just been released by the Capri label and is thought to be the singer's earliest known recording. Comes Love Lost Session 1960 derives from an acetate and is earlier than the classic bebop …

Published: 22 Sep 2021. Updated: 35 days.

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A highly mysterious Sheila Jordan studio recording has just been released by the Capri label and is thought to be the singer's earliest known recording. Comes Love Lost Session 1960 derives from an acetate and is earlier than the classic bebop singer's debut, Portrait of Sheila.

The unearthed recording contains a certain fascination in no small measure conjured up by its distinctive and highly unusual sound quality.

Characterful and intimate Comes Love was recorded in New York but details as to the identities of the piano trio on the album with Jordan, now in her nineties, are sketchy and there is no reliable personnel to confidently speculate about.

The main drama of the piece is in the Jordan interplay with the pianist who is very knowing and supportive. Jordan's voice is so still, the vibrato carefully controlled and not distracting, the sincerity palpable and true in the authentic milieu of the recording.

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Tommy Wolf and Fran Landesman's 'Ballad of the Sad Young Men' is beautifully captured. The original version of the song rendered in a show song setting by Tani Seitz came out only the year before.

Another highlight is the version of the Philippe-Gerard and Johnny Mercer song 'When the World Was Young' which on the later Portrait of Sheila found the singer instead accompanied initially by Barry Galbraith on guitar.