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Joe Armon-Jones makes Time magazine top 10 album list for 2019

Interesting that Time, a magazine that in 1964 put Thelonious Monk on its cover, picks the clubby DJ-friendly Turn to Clear View by Joe Armon-Jones among a top 10 that includes a bunch of big name pop, hip hop and rock acts. Armon-Jones was first …

Published: 28 Nov 2019. Updated: 55 days.

Interesting that Time, a magazine that in 1964 put Thelonious Monk on its cover, picks the clubby DJ-friendly Turn to Clear View by Joe Armon-Jones among a top 10 that includes a bunch of big name pop, hip hop and rock acts.

Armon-Jones was first on the marlbank radar when the Old Etonian pianist played with Gary Crosby and Denys Baptiste in their version of A Love Supreme we reviewed back in 2015. Here is how Time and writer Andrew R. Chow describe their decision, their pick of the new London scene:

''This year, the standout release from the scene came from Ezra Collective’s keyboardist, Joe Armon-Jones. Turn to Clear View moves effortlessly between jazz, R&B and hip-hop without diluting any of the three art forms; the songwriting is sharp but leaves plenty of open spaces for fiery improvisation, particularly from Armon-Jones himself and Garcia on saxophone. Diverse, inspired appearances from the Los Angeles singer Georgia Anne Muldrow, the Nigerian-British Afrobeat star Obongjayar and the London rapper Jehst all serve as testaments to the flourishing breadth and intensity of the music of the modern black diaspora.'' Via Time read the Full list. Inclusion on the radar of this globally renowned mass market magazine's list should illuminate Armon Jones' profile Stateside that bit brighter without a shadow of a doubt.

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Obscure crooner Jerry Vale enters a 21st century cinematic consciousness

A huge resurgence of interest in at this distance obscure crooner Jerry Vale surely begins soon. It sneaks up on you well into the three and a half hours of The Irishman and just kidnaps your ears. Sentimental enough for mobsters? Yes. A counterpart …

Published: 28 Nov 2019. Updated: 2 months.

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A huge resurgence of interest in at this distance obscure crooner Jerry Vale surely begins soon. It sneaks up on you well into the three and a half hours of The Irishman and just kidnaps your ears. Sentimental enough for mobsters? Yes. A counterpart pivotal moment to Scorsese's use of Mascagni in Raging Bull? Yes again.

It is quite a moment in the context of the brilliant new Martin Scorsese film. The fictionalised Vale is performing at the crucial Frank Sheeran tribute dinner where intrigue in the background and whispered conversations as he croons abound.

Vale is played by Steven Van Zandt from the Springsteen E Street band, the Bert Kaempfert song 'Spanish Eyes' and 'Al di La' he lip syncs to beaming through as a serene counterpoint to the contrasting insane turbulence of powerplay and future menace bubbling under. He makes a lot of better known crooners to have come in his wake seem quite ordinary.