Johnny Taylor, Barry Donohue and Dominic Mullen at the International Bar, Dublin

''Opposite Ruggy O’Donohoe’s Master Patrick Aloysius Dignam, pawing the pound and half of Mangan’s, late Fehrenbach’s, porksteaks he had been sent for, went along warm Wicklow street dawdling. It was too blooming dull sitting in the parlour with Mrs …

Published: 6 Nov 2019. Updated: 2 months.

''Opposite Ruggy O’Donohoe’s Master Patrick Aloysius Dignam, pawing the pound and half of Mangan’s, late Fehrenbach’s, porksteaks he had been sent for, went along warm Wicklow street dawdling. It was too blooming dull sitting in the parlour with Mrs Stoer and Mrs Quigley and Mrs Mac Dowell and the blind down and they all at their sniffles and sipping sups of the superior tawny sherry uncle Barney brought from Tunney’s. And they eating crumbs of the cottage fruit cake jawing the whole blooming time and sighing.'' (James Joyce, Ulysses)

In Ruggy O'Donohoe's, otherwise known as the International, the regular Tuesday night jazz session, one of Dublin's finest, according to one scene insider, was already underway. The line-up is not advertised in advance and gig goers get in free but stuff five euro notes into a little box in a convenient break after listening for a while. Breaking to chat a little to the ever growing audience as the night progressed: ''We play with guitarist Nigel Mooney,'' said drummer Dominic Mullen somewhat unassumingly, who did most of the talking explaining with a twinkle that Nigel likes things in a certain way, adding: ''We're not going to do it like that.''

Mullen is a busy presence at the kit and needed to have his wits about him as pianist Johnny Taylor has considerable skill and flexibility in his expansive way at the keyboards, the standards they chose to play seemed to get more difficult as the night wore on. So from the relatively straightforward Benny Golson number 'Whisper Not' to the iridescent 'Maiden Voyage' where the beanie hatted Barry Donohue on bass, a velveteen curtain behind him, came into his own opening the number sonorously (later a vastly elaborated upon 'Dolphin Dance' deepened the Herbie Hancock theme) this was no dawdle through the Real Book although the players did seem a little puzzled at times about deciding what to opt for next.

Taking place downstairs in the basement of the International, known under that name since 1886 according to the pub's own history, a famous photograph of revolutionary leader Michael Collins, who is said to have drank here, is enlarged and emblazoned on the wall adds a certain drama to the cosy domestic quaintness. You could almost taste the atmosphere and this fine trio cut a fitting dash and matched the mood of the evening just so. SG

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Famed jazz sound engineer Jan Erik Kongshaug has died

Norwegian media are reporting the death at 75 of Jan Erik Kongshaug, the famed sound engineer closely associated with many ECM records. The Oslo daily paper Dagsavisen has reported news of his death as too has Aftenposten. Kongshaug was a close …

Published: 5 Nov 2019. Updated: 3 months.

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Norwegian media are reporting the death at 75 of Jan Erik Kongshaug, the famed sound engineer closely associated with many ECM records. The Oslo daily paper Dagsavisen has reported news of his death as too has Aftenposten.

Kongshaug was a close collaborator with Manfred Eicher and ECM. After working at the Power Station studio in New York and the Arne Bendiksen and Talent studios in Oslo, he set up his own Rainbow Studio the sound of which his work became synonymous with. Tributes online to Kongshaug have included these words from Swedish pianist Daniel Karlsson: ''I'm forever thankful for the music he was part of and all the inspiration that [it] gave me through all the years.'' BBC Radio 3 presenter Fiona Talkington on Twitter wrote: ''RIP Jan Erik Kongshaug who has left an incredible legacy of music in his ECM sound. How many of us have been deeply touched by his work. Forever thanks.''

Manfred Eicher has paid tribute [6/11/19 update] to his late colleague: “Our first studio session together, and the beginning of a close collaboration lasting nearly fifty years, was Afric Pepperbird in September, 1970, with Jan Garbarek, Terje Rypdal, Arild Andersen and Jon Christensen. We were all rather innocent beginners, then but listening to the playback shared a growing awareness of participating in something special.”