Mark Kavuma and the Big Beat + guest George Kelly, Ninety One Living Room, Brick Lane

Opening the latest instalment of the Mark Kavuma and the Big Beat Ninety One Living Room residency with Kenny Dorham's 'Short Story' going back to Joe Henderson 1965 Blue Note album In 'n Out this was an evening of classic hard bop. I for one was …

Published: 23 Sep 2021. Updated: 24 days.

Opening the latest instalment of the Mark Kavuma and the Big Beat Ninety One Living Room residency with Kenny Dorham's 'Short Story' going back to Joe Henderson 1965 Blue Note album In 'n Out this was an evening of classic hard bop. I for one was keen to hear Kavuma for the first time live after earlier this month digging a whole lot the swinging Freddie Hubbard-esque 'Eliud' from Arashi No Ato (''After The Storm'') released on the trumpeter's new label. The album itself came out last week and among the personnel the pianist everyone is talking about since the Londoner won BBC Young Jazz Musician of the Year last year Deschanel Gordon was here with Kavuma who reminds me of giant of UK jazz piano Julian Joseph in terms of sheer power and the much missed McCoy Tyner for all the quartal harmony he does and the feeling he contributes.

Gordon is a brilliant comper and beyond this ability came into his own on Monk's 'Ask Me Now' ostensibly a feature for the bassist Ben Hazleton. Tenorist Mussinghi ''Songbird'' Brian Edwards played very well all night and I thoroughly enjoyed the rapport he has with Kavuma who is an imaginative leader. Chatting to Mark a few times during the evening he mentioned he goes way back with Songbird to his teens. Listen to 2019's 'The Songbird' as you read and you get a flavour of the characterful playing also heard tonight in quantity. In the second set there was a very nice guest spot by singer George Kelly excelling especially on a tasteful version of 'Skylark'. SG

Deschanel Gordon top left, Ben Hazleton, Mark Kavuma, Matt Fishwick and Mussinghi Brian Edwards. The Big Beat residency continues next week

Tags: Lives

Emma Rawicz, Vortex, Dalston

Hugely promising saxophonist and flautist Emma Rawicz​ was a scintillating presence at the Vortex last night. Appearing with a stellar band, the former Phronesis pianist Ivo Neame, guitarist Ant Law, double bassist Conor Chaplin and drummer James …

Published: 23 Sep 2021. Updated: 24 days.

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Hugely promising saxophonist and flautist Emma Rawicz​ was a scintillating presence at the Vortex last night. Appearing with a stellar band, the former Phronesis pianist Ivo Neame, guitarist Ant Law, double bassist Conor Chaplin and drummer James Maddren, Rawicz played mainly tenor saxophone switching for the encore piece 'Mantra' to flute and soprano sax. Hugely difficult music, very complex in its design and very vibrant and energetic in its execution the set began with the saxophonist's composition 'Voodoo' and later several pieces inspired by colours (Rawicz told us that she is a synaesthete) including for the first time 'Veridian' and 'Phlox' run together as one. Rawicz has fantastic tone and flexibility in her sound, compositionally the style is a little like Wayne Shorter​. Conor Chaplin, above left, Emma Rawicz, James Maddren