On Bones Michael Mayo drives the art of jazz vocals up to new heights

Extraordinary sounds from Michael Mayo on Bones (out now on Mack Avenue) it's clear. There are elements of lots of people but his approach is more than the sum of its many parts. Mayo certainly has the skill of a Sachal Vasandani and the flair and …

Published: 8 Jun 2021. Updated: 4 months.

Extraordinary sounds from Michael Mayo on Bones (out now on Mack Avenue) it's clear. There are elements of lots of people but his approach is more than the sum of its many parts. Mayo certainly has the skill of a Sachal Vasandani and the flair and mastery of a Kurt Elling. In terms of sheer vocal acrobatics yes there is a little of Bobby McFerrin in his approach and fans of Jacob Collier will find something of interest in the singer's debut especially in the polyphonic spree of the production and the singer's sprawling capturing of vocal adventure.

art7074_michael_mayo_by_shervin_lainez_300dpi_rgb_pr11__medium The improvising at the heart of his sound when Mayo breaks free from strict melody makes him stand out so much. From Los Angeles, Mayo attended the New England Conservatory of Music and become only the third vocalist accepted by the Thelonious Monk Institute where he was mentored by Herbie Hancock and with whom he later toured. The only difficult task is to select just one track from a groundbreaking album. But for sheer life force and exuberance it's got to be his original song and arrangement, 'Stolen Moments.' Michael Mayo, top. Photo: Shervin Lainez

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Album review: Xhosa Cole quartet, K​(​no​)​w Them, K​(​no​)​w Us, Stoney Lane Records ****

Straightahead and relatively retro bop styles can be quite dull in the wrong hands because they can seem stuck in a distant past and can struggle to remain relevant particularly if players bask in the past too much. In the right hands and …

Published: 8 Jun 2021. Updated: 4 months.

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Straightahead and relatively retro bop styles can be quite dull in the wrong hands because they can seem stuck in a distant past and can struggle to remain relevant particularly if players bask in the past too much. In the right hands and K​(​no​)​w Them, K​(​no​)​w Us lands there their rugged structures and architecture, swinging trajectories and room for tuneful themes and exploratory improvisation fascinate and delight. It is obvious that Xhosa Cole, the title puns partly on the letter K, because you say the saxist's first name like it's '''Kosa'' partly on a know/now minimal pair in the pronouncing that is playful (then adding in a homophone to know, the ''no'', in the bracketing within), has a fantastic technique on the tenor saxophone, up there with the very best and his solos have a mellifluous logic to them using timbres that can be light and airy. The ''them'' is open to interpretation and left wide open to a number of theories but could be taken to refer to repertory, the ''us'' the way to that particular corpus of work through the band itself.

K​(​no​)​w Them, K​(​no​)​w Us uses a very lived-in approach and is remarkable that Cole is only 24 because a lot of the times in jazz it is only the road-hardened seniors who have lived a bit and learnt on the bandstand and used life as a reference library who can play as convincingly as he also can with this fine simpatico band in this idiom.

His debut, fellow Birmingham scene stars altoist Soweto Kinch and pianist Reuben James, in a Dameronian role, guest, with Kinch returning the favour as Cole had appeared on his own release, 2019's The Black Peril. Drummer Jim Bashford swings hard on Ornette Coleman's 'Blues Connotation'. Overall the effect is a toe-tapper rather than a head-bobber in how the sound compels your body to move. And that feeling quite often applies throughout. The ballad 'Manhattan' shows the silky side of Cole's interpretative range.

Not a revolutionary statement at all, Cole isn't that kind of player and it isn't the point with his style on this record. A good question is what does ''revolutionary'' sound like these days anyway? Whatever the answer is it isn't in evidence here. However, Cole isn't remotely one to deliver a cosy or complacent listen either because as an improviser his revolt into 1950s stylings is actually a valid thing that he delves deeply into. His sheer individualism as a romantic who knows his way intimately around a ballad and the puckish wit of the bebop masters he bounces off makes this album work so well. Monk's 'Played Twice' demonstrates the rapport he has with trumpeter Jay Phelps. And above all Cole's soloing on Tadd Dameron's 'On A Misty Night' I think goes to the heart of his sound. The way that he can draw out the tenderness of the piece in the manner of the early John Coltrane sound is simply sparkling. Jay Phelps, top left (photos: via Stoney Lane Records), Jim Bashford, Xhosa Cole, James Owston. To be released on 30 July