Previously unreleased and earliest known Sheila Jordan recording Comes Love Lost Session 1960 paints a vivid picture

A highly mysterious Sheila Jordan studio recording has just been released by the Capri label and is thought to be the singer's earliest known recording. Comes Love Lost Session 1960 derives from an acetate and is earlier than the classic bebop …

Published: 22 Sep 2021. Updated: 35 days.

A highly mysterious Sheila Jordan studio recording has just been released by the Capri label and is thought to be the singer's earliest known recording. Comes Love Lost Session 1960 derives from an acetate and is earlier than the classic bebop singer's debut, Portrait of Sheila.

The unearthed recording contains a certain fascination in no small measure conjured up by its distinctive and highly unusual sound quality.

Characterful and intimate Comes Love was recorded in New York but details as to the identities of the piano trio on the album with Jordan, now in her nineties, are sketchy and there is no reliable personnel to confidently speculate about.

The main drama of the piece is in the Jordan interplay with the pianist who is very knowing and supportive. Jordan's voice is so still, the vibrato carefully controlled and not distracting, the sincerity palpable and true in the authentic milieu of the recording.

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Tommy Wolf and Fran Landesman's 'Ballad of the Sad Young Men' is beautifully captured. The original version of the song rendered in a show song setting by Tani Seitz came out only the year before.

Another highlight is the version of the Philippe-Gerard and Johnny Mercer song 'When the World Was Young' which on the later Portrait of Sheila found the singer instead accompanied initially by Barry Galbraith on guitar.

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Marcus Bonfanti and Jihad Darwish, Green Note basement, Camden Town

Nominated for a 2021 Jazz FM award in the blues category, singer and guitarist Marcus Bonfanti here with double bassist Jihad Darwish there's intimate and there's intimate and I can't think of anywhere quite as tiny and excellent as this basement, …

Published: 21 Sep 2021. Updated: 24 days.

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Nominated for a 2021 Jazz FM award in the blues category, singer and guitarist Marcus Bonfanti here with double bassist Jihad Darwish there's intimate and there's intimate and I can't think of anywhere quite as tiny and excellent as this basement, one of two Green Note spaces. Perhaps the Tatty Bogle near Carnaby Street if dear readers you recall that fine spot or the glorious 12 Bar Club of fond regard on Denmark Street come close and apposite. Playing on the carpet, arco double bass from Jay set the scene and an early dopamine rush was the duo's take on Dr John's 'Such a Night'. 'Work Song' didn't do much to me I'll fess up only through over-familiarity. However, things got deeper and Josh White's 'Jelly Jelly' (the Billy Eckstine and Earl Hines number from the 1940s) was worth the price of admission many times over. Later Doc Watson's 'Deep River Blues' was also superb. In the break Marcus chatted engagingly to marlbank about playing with Van Morrison and Paul Jones. 'Champagne and Reefer' hit the spot in the second entering the Magic Slim domain. Bonfanti is the business and Darwish was nimble and interesting throughout playing harmonies as well as walking the walk and rattling the wood like a mother when he took his rings off for the earthier numbers. Jihad Darwish, top and Marcus Bonfanti. Words & photo Stephen Graham