Ronnie's to reopen on 1 August

At last! Ronnie Scott’s is to reopen on 1 August albeit with a reduced capacity of 50 per cent and with strict social distancing measures in place. The Ronnie Scott’s All Stars, the last act to play before the closure, will re-open the club. Simon …

Published: 24 Jul 2020. Updated: 10 days.

At last! Ronnie Scott’s is to reopen on 1 August albeit with a reduced capacity of 50 per cent and with strict social distancing measures in place. The Ronnie Scott’s All Stars, the last act to play before the closure, will re-open the club. Simon Cooke, managing director of Ronnie Scott’s comments: ‘'It’s great to be back doing what we do, we have been looking on enviously whilst restaurants have reopened, especially as the club is laid out like a restaurant. We have been planning the relaunch for some time so as soon as we got the green light for live performance we moved into action. Our unique structure of seating lends itself to distancing, some may say the added space is an improvement! Safety of our customers, staff and artists is of paramount importance so there will be protocols for the customers, the staff and the musicians. It’s been reported that social distancing measures could be financially ruinous for many other music venues to open, but it would be financially ruinous for us not to!” Line-up details for opening period.

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Zara McFarlane, Songs Of An Unknown Tongue, Brownswood

There's a great album kicking and screaming to get out here. But the production never lets that happen, its electronic clash and murky blare just too attention grabbing. It's quite a departure for singer Zara McFarlane usually far more at home with …

Published: 23 Jul 2020. Updated: 11 days.

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There's a great album kicking and screaming to get out here. But the production never lets that happen, its electronic clash and murky blare just too attention grabbing. It's quite a departure for singer Zara McFarlane usually far more at home with a pared back rhythm section. Her songs are far more interesting than what producers Kwake Bass and Wu-lu have contributed. On one significant level this is a folkloric exploration of Jamaican traditions with its death rituals and celebrations, McFarlane's voice a clarion call among all the sonic clutter around swirling her. However, there is no real intimacy and the experimentalism seems to have lost sight of the essential necessity of making a connection with the listener. Shame really but one of these days McFarlane will surely come up with the classic album that we all know she is capable of creating. For now just go back to If You Knew Her which is by far her best work to date.