Svaneborg Kardyb, Op, Gondwana ***

Up up and away: we've been playing 'Op' to death recently and the duo responsible for said aural smörgåsbord - no filling station-derived Ginsters banqueting en route to Merthyr Tydfil for these guys, oh no, Svaneborg Kardyb land twice this year in …

Published: 5 Sep 2022. Updated: 21 days.

Up up and away: we've been playing 'Op' to death recently and the duo responsible for said aural smörgåsbord - no filling station-derived Ginsters banqueting en route to Merthyr Tydfil for these guys, oh no, Svaneborg Kardyb land twice this year in the 1 luv track of the day spot in itself fairly unusual. Note to the hardcore - you may scoff and sigh ''but this isn't jazz''. And you'd be right listening to this swirly hat dance of a tub thumper as much as you'd be wrong. However there is an affinity and the sound certainly sits nicely alongside some groove-based approaches.

The story so far 'Orbit' back in May from the Danish duo drummer Jonas Kardyb and keyboardist Nikolaj Svaneborg we thought at the time displayed a folk and Scandinavian jazz-soaked approach. This latest track has less of that and is more electro, loose, pop-like on one level in its level of repetition and endearingly naive ergo honest.

'Orbit' has a fuller sound but hey 'Op' - Danish for ''Up'' ain't too shabby either shaped around some meaty bass drum thumping and the prospect of the success of the full album certainly increases with every tease and new indication of the whole shebang.

Hear the duo at Sounds of Denmark this month - click for more details

Tags: 1 of 6 of the latest album and track reviews

Audio takeover - the empty chair

We're kicking off the audio takeover this week with a podcast today - get it on Spotify - on ways into jazz. The theme struck me yesterday when I attended a traditional Irish music session. In the area where marlbank regular commutes to and from …

Published: 5 Sep 2022. Updated: 22 days.

Next post

We're kicking off the audio takeover this week with a podcast today - get it on Spotify - on ways into jazz. The theme struck me yesterday when I attended a traditional Irish music session. In the area where marlbank regular commutes to and from there is very little jazz live. Perhaps a couple of times per year. That's it. So what's a way in round here or anywhere where the music is under-represented? You're new to the sounds, what next?

Go to a gig. That means travel

Stay local instead: put on a gig. Find out who the local musicians are and find a venue

Read as much as you can on the subject first. The greatest book on jazz is still to be written

Follow your heroes. For example if you are into Kamasi Washington listen to as much as you can by the saxophonist and move on to his influences or peers

Be open

Realise jazz even for musicians is more than technique. But do not underestimate the fact that jazz can be a hugely virtuosic type of music

Don't forget the basics: jazz was born in New Orleans in a world of slavery and subjugation and is essentially an African American creation that has changed massively over the years as the world has embraced it.

Study the subject at a music college

Transcribe solos

Find people who share your interest and share theirs

Collect records

Know the best exemplars of the music.

Trumpet - Wynton Marsalis, Terence Blanchard, Tom Harrell

Saxophone - Kamasi Washington, JD Allen, Courtney Pine, Shabaka Hutchings

Trombone - Ryan Keberle, Steve Davis, Dennis Rollins, Annie Whitehead

Vocals Cassandra Wilson, Eliane Elias, Norma Winstone, Gregory Porter, Kurt Elling

Piano Jason Moran, Vijay Iyer, Django Bates, Ethan Iverson

Bass Ron Carter, Christian McBride, Dave Holland, Reid Anderson

Drums Jack DeJohnette, Terri Lyne Carrington, Nasheet Waits

Final word

The community music making aspect of jazz is parallel to the scene above. Musicians sitting around a table, some newcomers sitting in. The tunes known from the past and then changed in the rendition. The result - creation, community, an audience coming together however small or large. The art of the jam session in jazz is different to the seisun but the priniciples are the same.

Granny Annie's late afternoon traditional music session. Photo: marlbank