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Lucid Dreamers lead the way as the Vortex gears up to reopen next week

Lucid Dreamers are the first band on when east London jazz club the Vortex reopens on Friday 21 May playing to two houses restricted in size given covidian regulations. All leaders in their own right the band's singer and leader Brigitte Beraha …

Published: 13 May 2021. Updated: 42 days.

Lucid Dreamers are the first band on when east London jazz club the Vortex reopens on Friday 21 May playing to two houses restricted in size given covidian regulations. All leaders in their own right the band's singer and leader Brigitte Beraha known for her work in Babelfish lands in the experimental Norma Winstone style tradition and like Winstone can stop you in your tracks with her quiet but devastating intent found in the most unexpected places.

A quartet, the band also features erstwhile doyen of the Kentish Town Oxford jazz pub scene saxist George Crowley excellent with Myele Manzanza recently and Brassmask in the early-2010s.

Tim Giles, known for his work with Richard Fairhurst in Hungry Ants, is on drums and electronics.

Completing the band is pianist Alcyona out of the Birmingham scene, whose style is a little in the Joanne Brackeen and Zoe Rahman mould, and a former pianist-in-residence downstairs in Derek's then part of a fine duo with the great drummer Paul Clarvis who is himself the drummer in Babelfish. Brigitte Beraha, top. For tickets follow: this link

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New live streaming music research is just published

A 53-page report into live music streaming carried out by academics from Middlesex University and King's College, London ''investigating the monetisation of live streams of musical performances in the wake of COVID-19'' is published this week and …

Published: 13 May 2021. Updated: 42 days.

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A 53-page report into live music streaming carried out by academics from Middlesex University and King's College, London ''investigating the monetisation of live streams of musical performances in the wake of COVID-19'' is published this week and finds that:

• 63% of participating musicians livestreamed a performance at least once.

• Almost half of musicians performed just once or a handful of times, while 10% performed over 40 livestreams.

• Musicians’ biggest concern about livestreaming was not being able to earn enough income to make it worthwhile. There was firm agreement from 83% of musicians that this was a barrier preventing them from livestreaming or livestreaming more.

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Source: Livestreaming Music in the UK: A Report for Musicians (A Research Project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council as part of UK Research and Innovation’s rapid response to COVID-19)

• 85% of attenders had experienced watching a livestream, either in pre­COVID times or since the start of the pandemic.

• Amongst both musicians and attenders, the six most used platforms were YouTube, Facebook, Vimeo, Instagram, Twitch, and Zoom, with YouTube and Facebook leading the field by a substantial margin.

• Almost all attenders (96%) in the group of those that had never watched a livestream broadly agreed that not being in the same physical room as the performer was a barrier to watching livestreams.

Download the full report from the Live Streaming Music website