INCOMING

INCOMING

Thommy Andersson, Wood Circles, Unit ****

'Floden' (from the Danish, ''the river'') roams as if phantoms steer the ghost boat. When the vocals come in they seem so unexpected. Josefine Cronholm, known for her work with Django Bates, again proves a highly convincing presence melding the …

Published: 27 Jun 2021. Updated: 26 days.

'Floden' (from the Danish, ''the river'') roams as if phantoms steer the ghost boat. When the vocals come in they seem so unexpected. Josefine Cronholm, known for her work with Django Bates, again proves a highly convincing presence melding the experimental with the simplicity of song introduced by the lovely touch of pianist Henrik Lindstrand. Sweden-born Denmark-based bassist Thommy Andersson, who also writes the compositions on the album, fashions some piquant voicing in the arrangements; the ache of Gunnar Halle's trumpet is an active ingredient. 'Fanfar' provides a certain sumptuousness throughout. But it's less effective.

Cronholm with Django Bates on Quiet Nights (1998, Screwgun)

However 'Whirly Birds' right at the beginning with little splashes of vibes and again the skill in the arranging is evident and interesting as Cronholm stretches out. Lauren Kinsella seems a kindred spirit of Cronholm's. 'The Barn' is highly effective for its bass resonances in the opening. Returning to 'Floden' often for the beautiful, practically hymnal, piano opening at the very least is definitely a plan. Because it only takes a few notes to know that you have reached a destination. Out now. Link

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Live review: Alex Garnett quartet, Vortex

The veritable reincarnation of Tubby Hayes, a Rolls-Royce tenor saxophonist of that extraordinary calibre born to play, needless to say the Vortex audience reassuringly knew how and where to clap in the right places and yet this was a straightahead …

Published: 25 Jun 2021. Updated: 27 days.

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The veritable reincarnation of Tubby Hayes, a Rolls-Royce tenor saxophonist of that extraordinary calibre born to play, needless to say the Vortex audience reassuringly knew how and where to clap in the right places and yet this was a straightahead invasion of the east London venue given how little of the idiom is played in the club, the dyke is breached. Finely moustachioed Alex Garnett himself the son of a swinging saxophonist and hewn into the bricks and mortar at Cooke-era Ronnie Scott's as an omniscient senior certainly called 'Always' to begin. That's deep. Irving Kaufman, Josephine Baker, 1926 deep. A song picked up by Benny Goodman a decade later and subsequently run with by Dave Brubeck, Tony Bennett and Billie Holiday in the 50s you gotta go back to understand the appeal and above all the genius of Irving Berlin who wrote the song, still peerless in the tower of song. My favourite version of 'Always' is Houston Person's with Ron Carter and Garnett's flickered luminously among the many extant versions. Garnett was here with relative newcomer pianist Chris Eldred who has fast hands and can stretch; double bassist Conor Chaplin heard last month down here on the corner of Dalston's Bailey Place and Gillett Square with Tom Ollendorff; and, completing the line-up, Matt Home, a very disciplined and technically accomplished drummer, who knows his Kenny Clarke. A jaw-dropping masterclass in timing above all, Garnett playing chorus after chorus to rotate like the windmills of your mind, Monk was one theme, 'Work' simmering most. Garnett's own 'Lydia' was only let down by the sound mix. 'Reflections' another Monk was a high point getting later on into the set. Oscar Moore piece 'Beautiful Moons Ago' won the day. SG

Alex Garnett's London Supersax Project is at Ronnie Scott's on 30 July