Track of the day: Chelsea Carmichael, There is You and You, Native Rebel ****

Go to Chelsea to burn the house down and there's some firestarting that you do not want to be extinguished that builds from a tight easy-to-wrap-your-ears-around riff and fans out into quite a day trip. With some choice Okumu-Herbert underpinning …

Published: 28 Aug 2021. Updated: 21 days.

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Go to Chelsea to burn the house down and there's some firestarting that you do not want to be extinguished that builds from a tight easy-to-wrap-your-ears-around riff and fans out into quite a day trip. With some choice Okumu-Herbert underpinning when the piece generates its own momentum and unravels there's a rampaging Sons of Kemet swagger to 'There is You and You' new from Chelsea Carmichael here on tenor saxophone, the Kemet connection overt given that Shabaka Hutchings produced and the Kemets ex-Orient House Ensemble drummer Eddie Hick simmers and stirs throughout. There's a rawness to Carmichael (the Hendersonian Meiliana Gillard shares with her a sense of edge even when the idiom is different) that comes across and a lot of power. And after a little, yes, honking from Carmichael, Okumu's seriously dirty guitar solo around the three-and-a-half minute mark will rouse you from your stupor and probably up to punch the air and steal the available light. SG. Chelsea Carmichael photo: Adama Jalloh

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Track of the day: Lyle Mays, Eberhard *****

So beautiful, gentle and perfect, here's 'Eberhard,' the last recording of Lyle Mays who died last year. Mays, an acclaimed keyboardist, arranger and composer and multi-Grammy winner in his lifetime became closely identified with the music of Pat …

Published: 27 Aug 2021. Updated: 21 days.

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So beautiful, gentle and perfect, here's 'Eberhard,' the last recording of Lyle Mays who died last year. Mays, an acclaimed keyboardist, arranger and composer and multi-Grammy winner in his lifetime became closely identified with the music of Pat Metheny over many years and was part of the history-making sound that the Pat Metheny Group ushered in abidingly to the vocabulary of jazz from the late-1970s/early-80s onwards. The piece takes its title from the first name of the German bass icon Eberhard Weber. A 13-minute, long form composition composed in 2009 and recorded during the final six months of Mays' life it was in the late-1970s and early-1980s that he himself recorded with Weber on the Metheny album Water Colors (1977) and on Weber's Later That Evening (1982). The newly released recording sees Mays with a substantial cast of players: Bob Sheppard takes a communicative tenor saxophone solo that speaks volumes; Mitchel Forman is on keys; Bill Frisell, guitar; Steve Rodby double bass (and in a co-producer role); Jimmy Johnson, bass guitar; Alex Acuña, drums, percussion; Jimmy Branly, drums, percussion; Wade Culbreath, marimba/vibes; Mays' niece Aubrey Johnson on vocals along with fellow singers Rosana and Gary Eckert; cellists Timothy Loo, Erika Duke-Kirkpatrick, Eric Byers and Armen Ksajikian. The piece is a composition that dates to 2009 written for the Zeltsman Marimba Festival and recorded in Los Angeles during the second half of 2019 in the months preceding May's death. What a gift to the planet. Lyle Mays photo: lylemays.com