Haltingly minimalist, a trademark of Finding Time in its entirety, on opener ‘Passing Phase’ composer Andrew Skeet – known for his work with the Cocteau Twins’ Simon Raymonde and Neil Hannon – provides a waterdrop quality to ‘Setting Out’ as splashes of piano notes fall down an imaginary windowpane.

‘Killing Time’ as you can hear above is more gothic, the warp and weft of call and response interplay between piano and sonar-like electronics a beacon of enchantment.

‘Changing Lines’ has more of a sense of urgency, almost like the mood conveyed by Portico Quartet on Isla, but the interlocking patterns Skeet prefers shift to plunge into refreshing pools of melody and rhythm rippling ever outwards like patterns on a computer screen at rest.

‘Pursuing the Horizon’ with its play on the lethargy of long legato passages and strings anxious to find a way home developing into a luxurious theme might appear initially to be the filler in this sandwich, the meat coming at an unexpected crunch point.

‘Reflect’ is beautiful, gorgeous strings and more after a shimmering start, while a strong carefully weighted sense of the baroque on ‘Taking Off’ comes as a surprise.

‘Stop the Clock’ later has a certain menace only an album with such a strong sense of narrative and incredible studio production values such as this can convey.

Penultimate track ‘The Unforgiving Minute’ folds in hints of rock and electronica to the mix while ‘Finding Time’ nudges shoegazingly towards the dance floor.

It all comes across as music for film or TV even though it’s not, and I suppose that’s inevitable in a way given Skeet’s background. Stations like Classic FM will surely lap right up Finding Time’s elegantly Einaudi-like calm and neatness. SG