2019 Highlight: ILLUMINATED SILENCE, Izumi Kimura, Barry Guy, Gerry Hemingway, Fundacja Słuchaj

From January 2019. This seems like a collection of fragments, a piecing together if you will or a recovery from some sort of innate experience of silence that somehow needs expressing in music. Sometimes a shard of melody emerges from the rubble …

Published: 27 Nov 2019. Updated: 9 months.

From January 2019. This seems like a collection of fragments, a piecing together if you will or a recovery from some sort of innate experience of silence that somehow needs expressing in music.

Sometimes a shard of melody emerges from the rubble like the lovely Ornette Coleman-like reverie at the beginning of ‘Blue Horizon’ but just as often the incompleteness stands as a statement in its own right Izumi Kimura on piano nudging the movement of the improvisation along arbitrated by the measured sense that Barry Guy on bass instils.

The discipline needed by Gerry Hemingway on drums is very different to the usual role of time keeper or rhythm maker, his role is more about colour, a splash of cymbal here or there.

Recorded in a Dublin church last year Illuminated Silence turns into a stealthy meditation, the silence interspersed by the sound of the audience, a kind of a lament in places and yet full of hope. SG

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Joe Locke, Subtle Disguise, Origin

From 2018. One of the world’s great vibists Joe Locke’s music nonetheless can be oblique and not always immediately instantly digestible. However, this is not the case here on an absorbing listen full of twists and turns. There is a brightness in …

Published: 27 Nov 2019. Updated: 3 years.

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From 2018. One of the world’s great vibists Joe Locke’s music nonetheless can be oblique and not always immediately instantly digestible. However, this is not the case here on an absorbing listen full of twists and turns.

There is a brightness in the voicings, a driving fury to the grown-up improvising but above all a great deal of clarity in the layering, structuring, melody and improvisational journey.

David Binney’s guest spot on ‘Red Cloud’ gets the energy level right up and he is one of four guests, the starriest of these being soulful everyman Raul Midón.

Locke himself nestled within a core quartet allows him to operate as both a member of the rhythm section and break out soloist and in the latter role he is a master of colour.

In a nutshell this is accessible yet aware of the apparent contradiction still very complex jazz that tests the band in terms of mood shift and pacing. Soak it up.