Daily jazz blog, Marlbank

Anthony Wilson, Collodion, Colorfield ****

There is a lot of stimulating jazz flavoured electronica around. Take Collodion. Contrasting massively with last year's vocals inputted pastoral Americana found on The Plan of Paris, 'Daughters of the Night' particularly featuring strafing runs …

Published: 13 Jul 2023. Updated: 11 months.

There is a lot of stimulating jazz flavoured electronica around. Take Collodion. Contrasting massively with last year's vocals inputted pastoral Americana found on The Plan of Paris, 'Daughters of the Night' particularly featuring strafing runs from US guitarist-composer-leader Anthony Wilson lands a world away from both his recent work and the sort of vintage situation that Wilson became jazz famous for and contributed so much to - working with the great Canadian singer Diana Krall. Collodion isn't needless to say a ballads and bossa affair. The title track, with a handsome piano statement at the beginning offset by a sheen of instrumental polish that goes half way to soundtrack fodder but has enough content to be able to exist without any visual or action stimulus.

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Serenity is vital and achieved in many places throughout an album that is not at all stripped of a sense of event or worse placelessness. But it does take a while to change up a gear - there is a good deal of exploratory prologue as it turns out necessary (as well as astronomical statement) on 'Star Guide,' 'Planetary Terms' and 'Keeping'. The production textural feel is terrific - issued on Pete Min's Colorfield label and recorded at his studio in Los Angeles the sonics prove very 2020s. Wilson himself makes use of guitar, piano, keys, bass, drums, percussion and kalimba in the gathering of instruments and the accompanying musicians notably include drummer's drummer Mark Guiliana who proved so persuasive on Mischief this year. 'Arrival At Kanazawa' with its piston like throbbing propulsion (and bear with us Van Halen-like push and shove chug of 'Jump' given a bit of licence) is streaming. Highlights in terms of organically arrived-at break through passages include the sax soloing of Daniel Rotem on 'Dream Oracle.' Anthony Wilson, photo: Ricky Chavez

Out on 11 August

Tags: Reviews

Track of the day: Idris Ackamoor and The Pyramids, Thank You God, Strut

Track of the day: from Idris Ackamoor and The Pyramids and a track from late-September's Afro Futuristic Dreams - praise song 'Thank You God'. Go for the longer 13-minute version on Spotify - you'll see there is also a shorter one streaming but you …

Published: 13 Jul 2023. Updated: 11 months.

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Track of the day: from Idris Ackamoor and The Pyramids and a track from late-September's Afro Futuristic Dreams - praise song 'Thank You God'. Go for the longer 13-minute version on Spotify - you'll see there is also a shorter one streaming but you need the arc of the piece shaped in full. Three years on from Shaman, Ackamoor (sax, keytar, organ), Margaux Simmons (flute), Sandra Poindexter (violin) and Bobby Cobb (guitar) on the album look to themes including police brutality, celebrations of the ancestors and cosmic journeys. But for now you get into a flow state too via the repetition in the guitar riff and the wave upon wave of Pharoah Sanders-like explorations that dwell on a ''peace and tranquility'' heartfelt benevolence that works like a charm on this lead-off piece.