In the bass domain where Mats Eilertsen illuminates

Full of a certain melancholia rising up from despair, double bassist Mats Eilertsen has Hymn For Hope out in the autumn. Less Edvard Munk more landing in the mantle of a transcendental vision November time's Hymn for Hope features the poetic tenor …

Published: 11 Aug 2021. Updated: 38 days.

HymnForHope_cover

Full of a certain melancholia rising up from despair, double bassist Mats Eilertsen has Hymn For Hope out in the autumn.

Less Edvard Munk more landing in the mantle of a transcendental vision November time's Hymn for Hope features the poetic tenor saxophonic oration (as opposed to scream) of Tore Brunborg with in the harmonic underpinning guitarist Thomas Dahl and drummer Hans Hulbækmo in the den of the Norwegian bass don.

Sadly only the cover art is available to share so far from this release which is all Eilertsen tunes. If a track becomes available I'll do a further post. But it is worth commenting as a hint that the writing throughout is very convincing.

Pick of early listens is the mighty 'Sunday' led off by a lovely percussive line and a big statement from Eilertsen behind which a legato line whirs mysteriously along with the ritual patter of percussion that adds a sense of Indo mysticism. When Brunborg comes in it is frankly, let's level, jaw-dropping. SG

Hymn of Hope cover above

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Yussef Dayes and Tom Misch are Ivor nominated for What Kinda Music

Ivors nominations just announced for best album this year include What Kinda Music written by Yussef Dayes, Tom Misch and Rocco Palladino. The title track was a bit of a banger released as lead-off track on the Blue Note issued album which made the …

Published: 11 Aug 2021. Updated: 38 days.

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Ivors nominations just announced for best album this year include What Kinda Music written by Yussef Dayes, Tom Misch and Rocco Palladino. The title track was a bit of a banger released as lead-off track on the Blue Note issued album which made the top 10 of the UK album charts back in April. The sound is relatable to open minded jazz listeners given the world the music swims in although it largely bypasses into a commercial sound. Misch is an everyman kind of artist and not genre-bound by any means so far in his meteoric rise. The album strings are beautifully arranged and the gentle vocal appealing, Misch is charting new territory.