Best Wynton record in years

It's been a long time since a Wynton Marsalis record really captured the imagination. Live at the House of Tribes to my mind was the last standout record by the great trumpeter and that was 15 years ago. The Ever Fonky Lowdown however has perhaps …

Published: 27 Aug 2020. Updated: 32 days.

It's been a long time since a Wynton Marsalis record really captured the imagination. Live at the House of Tribes to my mind was the last standout record by the great trumpeter and that was 15 years ago. The Ever Fonky Lowdown however has perhaps ended that long run of looking for a really significant record. Narrated by actor Wendell Pierce, amusing satirically wry commentary jostles with energised incisive big band-backed vocals and features the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with vocals from Camille Thurman, Ashley Pezzotti, Christie Dashiell, and Doug Wamble. Is America ready for the wit and knowingness of Wynton's very own Fables of Faubus?

Tags: 2020 best so far tracks / albums

Teodross Avery digs deep into the music of Thelonious Monk

Here's Teodross Avery playing the swinger 'Teo' from Harlem Stories: The Music of Thelonious Monk just out on Willie Jones III's WJ3 Records. The soprano and tenor saxophonist is making his ninth release as a leader on this album fronting two …

Published: 27 Aug 2020. Updated: 32 days.

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Here's Teodross Avery playing the swinger 'Teo' from Harlem Stories: The Music of Thelonious Monk just out on Willie Jones III's WJ3 Records. The soprano and tenor saxophonist is making his ninth release as a leader on this album fronting two complementary quartets immersed in all things Monk. Avery says: “When I was 15 years old, I used to listen to Monk’s album, Monk’s Dream, with the volume on 10 on my dad’s huge speakers. I began to hear how important the swing rhythm was to Thelonious Monk’s music. It became clear to me that Monk wanted his complex melodies and harmonies to affect the musicians and the listeners alike with non-stop swing rhythms. This was his method. He wanted that swing beat to just permeate the sound while he delivered his unique sound on top.” 'Teo' was first titled as a tribute to the Monk (1965 released) album producer Teo Macero on which the tune appeared and of course nicely puns in this new context as an abbreviation of Teodross.