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Dan Wilson, 'Cry Me a River,' featuring Joy Brown ****

Noise that's Joy-ful, Joy Brown in this case the singer here on Arthur Hamilton's 'Cry Me A River' one of the vocal track selections from the must-hear Dan Wilson record Vessels of Wood and Earth. Look at who's breezed in? As previously discussed …

Published: 26 Apr 2021. Updated: 11 days.

Noise that's Joy-ful, Joy Brown in this case the singer here on Arthur Hamilton's 'Cry Me A River' one of the vocal track selections from the must-hear Dan Wilson record Vessels of Wood and Earth. Look at who's breezed in? As previously discussed in these pages 'Who Shot John' is another strong candidate among the tracks. Guitarist Wilson produced by Christian McBride for the Philadelphian jazz icon's own Brother Mister label album Vessels personnel include a range of leaders in their own right as you'll find pianist Christian Sands, bassist Marco Panascia, Jeff “Tain” Watts on drums and then the relative newcomer aforementioned guest Brown playing a significant part.

As for 'Cry Me A River' for the sheer oomph I'm going not to Julie London, much as I love that classic version, not to Ella, again ditto, or other versions but to the Dakota Staton treatment, the one on I Want a Country Man (Groove Merchant, 1973), also issued on Congratulations to Someone, Dakota quite wondrously with Manny Albam's big band. Brown's not the same kind of singer at all, but certainly goes for power in her own way and it works in the more intimate context with Wilson comping. Final word Dan dares to dream. Imagine hearing George Benson for the first time being actually there? Setting the tardis it is hard to ask for anything more. SG.

Vessels of Wood and Earth is out now via Mack Avenue on Brother Mister

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Online gig: Anthony Kerr, the Art of the Vibes, Ronnie Scott's

Vibes, double bass and drums are a format that you don't often hear these days as a unit. Add piano and in the past you would have got a sound as durable and significant as the Modern Jazz Quartet. Anthony Kerr, whose style bears a surface …

Published: 26 Apr 2021. Updated: 11 days.

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Vibes, double bass and drums are a format that you don't often hear these days as a unit. Add piano and in the past you would have got a sound as durable and significant as the Modern Jazz Quartet. Anthony Kerr, whose style bears a surface resemblance to the MJQ's Milt Jackson, live streamed with bassist Jeremy Brown and drummer Ed Richardson from Ronnie Scott's last night.

Opening with tunes by Coltrane, 'Lazy Bird' and 'Wise One' (the more effective of the two), a sprightly Mingus interpretation ('Nostalgia in Times Square') early on too the set changed gear a few times and was most interesting on tackling Brad Mehldau's 'Unrequited' where Kerr showed that he can be more modernist than you might imagine if you only know his work from playing with Georgie Fame. A slightly shy leader as a player he certainly knows how to stretch out and there was a lot of mobility to the trio's rapid canter through their impressive set. Highlight? The bouncing take on Chick Corea's 'Bud Powell' ringing in the air. Watch the stream here