David Mrakpor, 'My Life' feat. James Coleman, Jazz re:freshed (single) ***

Marlbank's favourite new artist in 2021 is David Mrakpor whose piano-playing certainly reminds us of Robert Glasper. It all spwaned from hearing him live back in June at a spot called the Post Bar in Tottenham which made it into our gigs of the year

Published: 8 Dec 2021. Updated: 5 months.

Marlbank's favourite new artist in 2021 is David Mrakpor whose piano-playing certainly reminds us of Robert Glasper. It all spwaned from hearing him live back in June at a spot called the Post Bar in Tottenham which made it into our gigs of the year selection. There's a lot to his work (he is a fine vibist, writer, and guitarist as well) and if you heard Blue Lab Beats' We Will Rise this year you will know that there is another side to Mrakpor's personality within that duo. The Londoner is a jazz superstar in the wings waiting to be anointed surely.

'My Life' is fundamentally shaped around a very elongated vamp within a lush orchestrated coating which is certainly Glasper-ish. And it is in his signature twist here pretty melodic and not demanding, the emphasis on positivity and grooving harnessing call and response from riff to repeated single note, that proves a catalyst. There is quite a loose improvisational hinting-at feel which lifts it from being just trite. Coleman's vocals are very sunny and more about atmospherics than elaborate song statement. The net result is a song that is perfect for radio play and I'll bet that London station Jazz FM, who usually go for non avant-garde tracks for their daytime play selections, will be more than keen on the track. This could cue up a credible new genre of ''daytime jazz'' within a suite of lounge sounds careeering down the slipway under lick wizard Mrakpor's own considerable steam and motion.

Tags:

Open – in a silent way: Tapani Rinne and Juha Mäki-Patola embrace the ambient

One of 2021's most acclaimed jazz-related releases was Promises from electronica artist Floating Points and jazz saxophone titan Pharoah Sanders and the London Symphony Orchestra. In a not very dissimilar style minus a symphony orchestra and yet …

Published: 8 Dec 2021. Updated: 5 months.

Next post

One of 2021's most acclaimed jazz-related releases was Promises from electronica artist Floating Points and jazz saxophone titan Pharoah Sanders and the London Symphony Orchestra. In a not very dissimilar style minus a symphony orchestra and yet the sound scales up just as magisterially, the Finnish duo of reedist Tapani Rinne and synth player Juha Mäki-Patola enter that remarkable still and ambient zone and it's another stunning approach that is worth becoming familiar with immediately ahead of the full album Open's 2022 release on the Seattle-based Hush Hush label.

Rinne already has been part of a classic recording of European free-music on the momentous Edward Vesala classic Lumi released by ECM in 1986. But this is his first collaboration with a musician from a further generation on in Mäki-Patola whose inspirations include Jóhann Jóhannsson, Nils Frahm and Max Richter and who emerged as a solo artist just last year with the album Breath.

Mäki-Patola says: ''The Beginning for 'Open Part I' was the meditative piano motif that I sent over to Tapani. He composed improvisational exploratory tenor saxophone melodies over the piano motif and minimal ambient synthesizer layers''. Look out for further singles from Open entitled 'Fall' in late-January and 'Brevity' to be released in mid-February. Tapani Rinne and Juha Mäki-Patola, top. Photo: Sami Mannerheimo