Daily jazz blog, Marlbank

Dominique Pifarély draws on the inspiration of Paul Celan towards the celestial world

The poet Paul Celan (1920-70) is the abiding inspiration of violinist Dominique Pifarély's Suite: Anabasis new this month on the Jazzdor Series label. Celan, born in Romania to a German-speaking Jewish family and who studied medicine in Paris just …

Published: 2 Aug 2021. Updated: 2 years.

The poet Paul Celan (1920-70) is the abiding inspiration of violinist Dominique Pifarély's Suite: Anabasis new this month on the Jazzdor Series label. Celan, born in Romania to a German-speaking Jewish family and who studied medicine in Paris just before the second world war, was later sent by the Nazis to a forced labour camp from which he escaped. He wrote mainly in German and was influenced by surrealism. On this studio recording of Pifarély's composition Suite: Anabasis the violinist, known for his work on the ECM label for instance 2015 release solo violin album Time Before and Time After on which literary inspirations included Mahmoud Darwish, Fernando Pessoa and again Celan figured can punctuate bittersweet tonalities with jostling staccato phrasing as easily as he can conjure lovely legato reveries. With Pifarély on the suite are cellists Valentin Ceccaldi and Bruno Ducret, flautist Sylvaine Hélary, saxophonists Matthieu Metzger and François Corneloup, pianist Antonin Rayon and drummer François Merville. An anabasis if you are wondering say Jazzdor ''is an expedition from a coastline up into the interior of a country'' and also represents ''the rise of the spirit towards the sacred mountain, the celestial world.''

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Indie-jazz labels leading the way: August 21 update

What do we as a community look for in a jazz label nowadays when often, especially while consuming jazz as a stream, the label isn't even obvious and the artwork is a tiny image? It's no longer a case of looking for sleeve notes either given that …

Published: 2 Aug 2021. Updated: 2 years.

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What do we as a community look for in a jazz label nowadays when often, especially while consuming jazz as a stream, the label isn't even obvious and the artwork is a tiny image? It's no longer a case of looking for sleeve notes either given that the format does not allow for them unless you choose physical and even there quite a few labels do not offer significant sleeve notes apart from reissues. But there is no doubt that convenience drives choice of format, quality of sound (yes even on a stream) and access via your phone or laptop makes life a lot easier when your records are stuck somewhere in your loft or filed away and you're not at home to take them out and prefer to be agile instead. People want different things. Above all a label is a great curator of music and breathes new air. The label chooses artists that somehow hang together even when styles are poles apart sometimes thriving on the contrasts but not jarring as a collective of people and ideas. Labels can drive new styles in jazz and above all they stand for something tangible so anyone coming to them know they are going to be inspired.

Here's our pick for our August update of the indies making a difference with what's recent or coming up:

1/ CAM Jazz (Italy). Going through a purple patch. For Fabio Giachino's Limitless and Giovanni Guidi's Gato Barbieri tribute

2/ Mack Avenue (USA) For the hot prospect that is Kenny Garrett's first album in 5 years

3/ Efpi (England) For the absolutely essential Revival Room

4/ Savant (USA) For JD Allen's solo explorations, Queen City

5/ Rainy Days (Russia) for the considerable prospect that is Rachel Eckroth's The Garden

For more read the July update

And June's guide is here