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Don the Dreamer from Journeys In Modern Jazz: Britain (1965-1972) streams

Kenny Wheeler's 'Don the Dreamer' from the classic Windmill Tilter (The Story Of Don Quixote) (1969) is the first track on the double LP compilation Journeys In Modern Jazz: Britain (1965-1972) that is part of a raft of new British jazz reissues …

Published: 28 May 2021. Updated: 27 days.

Kenny Wheeler's 'Don the Dreamer' from the classic Windmill Tilter (The Story Of Don Quixote) (1969) is the first track on the double LP compilation Journeys In Modern Jazz: Britain (1965-1972) that is part of a raft of new British jazz reissues headed British Jazz Explosion: Originals Re-Cut.

Among the personnel is tellingly at the beating heart of the brassily rumbustious vibes-flavoured jauntiness of the sound there on double bass is none other than Dave Holland, one of the most renowned English and British jazz musicians to ever achieve global icon stature in the history of the music that spawned from his time initially playing with Miles Davis on such classics as In A Silent Way.

The compilation also includes tracks by the Don Rendell Quintet, Collin Bates Trio, John Surman & John Warren, the Michael Garrick Sextet, Mike Westbrook Concert Band, Stan Tracey Big Band, Harry Beckett, Neil Ardley and Ian Carr, The New Jazz Orchestra, Alan Skidmore Quintet, Dick Morrissey Quartet, Mike Taylor Quartet and Mike Gibbs.

Part of a new Tony Higgins-compiled series of remasters for vinyl, releases are drawn from the Decca, Argo, Lansdowne, Deram and Fontana jazz back catalogues.

The compilation release date is 16 July the same day as the release of Don Rendell's Space Walk followed in August by Ken Wheeler & the John Dankworth Orchestra's Windmill Tilter (The Story Of Don Quixote) and in September The New Jazz Orchestra's Le Déjeuner sur l'Herbe.

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Live review: Tom Ollendorff trio at the Vortex

Catching the last set of the Tom Ollendorff trio at the Vortex last night as the guitarist continues with trio dates touring A Song For You the striking aspect of Ollendorff's approach is partly to soft-sing to and around his virtuosic guitar …

Published: 28 May 2021. Updated: 27 days.

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Catching the last set of the Tom Ollendorff trio at the Vortex last night as the guitarist continues with trio dates touring A Song For You the striking aspect of Ollendorff's approach is partly to soft-sing to and around his virtuosic guitar lines. The London-based guitarist's debut, both Irish-born Conor Chaplin on double bass and French drummer Marc Michel, a matador presence (who reminded me stylistically of Tingvall trio drummer Jürgen Spiegel) from the album were present for this intimate Dalston appearance.

'Not in These Days' inspired by poet Jane Tyson Clement and the Charlie Parker rarity 'Bongo Beep' resounded appealingly in the blend of material. Ollendorf's sound is unusual, his improvisations grounded in ferociously detailed bebop intricacy that is overlaid by a veneer of dreamy introspection that the soft amplification treatment rounds off almost to the point of lontano. Album track Ollendorff original 'XY' was the pick of the set closely followed by the atmospheric 'Aare' named after a river that flows through Bern. While Chaplin certainly stole the show as the motor of the ensemble, his robustness of purpose and a darting momentum to his direction driving the sound forward, Ollendorff's quietly determined if cautious approach increasingly made sense the further into his dream world a listener travels buoyed by the trio's persuasive sense of momentum. SG. Tom Ollendorff, top