Eugene Wright, double bassist in the classic Dave Brubeck quartet, has died

The double bassist from the classic Dave Brubeck quartet Eugene Wright has died. The official Brubeck Twitter feed broke the news earlier this evening in a series of tweets. ''We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of bassist Eugene Wright …

Published: 31 Dec 2020. Updated: 21 months.

The double bassist from the classic Dave Brubeck quartet Eugene Wright has died. The official Brubeck Twitter feed broke the news earlier this evening in a series of tweets.

''We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of bassist Eugene Wright yesterday at the age of 97. Gene was the last surviving member of the 'classic' Dave Brubeck Quartet, and remained a good friend and honorary Uncle to the Brubeck family to the end,'' the messages begin.

Wright joined the group in 1958 becoming a permanent member a year later.

Further tweets on the Brubeck feed give more detail indicating that Wright ''left the Quartet in 1968 when Dave disbanded the group to pursue his career as a composer, but Gene performed with Dave off and on for many years afterwards, including the famous 1988 Joint State Dinner organized by President Reagan and Secretary Gorbachev in Moscow.'' […]

''We remember the challenges Gene and the Quartet had to undergo in order to play at segregated universities on their US tours in the early 1960s.''

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US pianist Frank Kimbrough, known for his longstanding work with Maria Schneider, has died

Media in the US have reported the death of pianist and composer Frank Kimbrough. He was 64 and the cause of death was due to a heart attack. A pianist with the Maria Schneider Orchestra for a quarter of a century a span that included his having …

Published: 31 Dec 2020. Updated: 21 months.

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Media in the US have reported the death of pianist and composer Frank Kimbrough. He was 64 and the cause of death was due to a heart attack. A pianist with the Maria Schneider Orchestra for a quarter of a century a span that included his having appeared on the recently acclaimed album Data Lords, Kimbrough also stacked up a lengthy discography of well received records under his own name. His monumental take on Monk titled Monk's Dreams for instance generated a lot of interest when it came out in 2018.

Kimbrough's fellow pianist Ethan Iverson has paid tribute on his blog Do the Math: ''Frank was part of the Jazz Composers Collective, a group with Ben Allison, Ted Nash, and others. They programmed original music at a series held at the Greenwich House Music School. One of the best sets of the many I heard there in the 90s was a trio with Frank, Ben Allison, and Jeff Ballard. The opening piece was unforgettable, where Frank offered some bluesy triadic piano riffs before the bass and drums came in with controlled chaos.

''After Paul Bley died, I organized a memorial concert on the Greenwich House Music School stage. Frank was the Paul Bley expert, and he showed up with a stack of Annette Peacock music. In a way I wish I had made the concert more about playing those Peacock and Carla Bley melodies; some of the best stuff that night was simply Frank reading through 'Nothing Ever Matters, Anyway' and 'Butterflies' at the soundcheck.''