INCOMING

INCOMING

Fergus McCreadie, Cairn

It was striking hearing Fergus McCreadie in a hardcore jazz club setting among an audience of people who hear the best jazz musicians regularly, and who know what's what far better than most. This was like 2018 hearing saxist Matt Carmichael's band …

Published: 29 Jan 2021. Updated: 5 months.

It was striking hearing Fergus McCreadie in a hardcore jazz club setting among an audience of people who hear the best jazz musicians regularly, and who know what's what far better than most. This was like 2018 hearing saxist Matt Carmichael's band descend from Scotland to grab London jazzland by the short and curlies. I couldn't really see the pianist on the left hand side of the tiny stage from where I was standing at the back and couldn't see his hands at all. But I could certainly hear what he could do on the club's superb Steinway. Fergus looked like Jesus that night and sounded like Keith. Jeez you can't really sound like Jarrett unless you are potentially world class as a player by the way. The new artist photos feature a less biblical look. Turas that year with McCreadie, David Bowden on double bass and Stephen Henderson on drums had a sense of flow that was very mature and was probably the best jazz by any Scot I'd heard since oh hearing Tommy Smith's part on Mira back in 2014. On Cairn Fergus does go full tilt again into his material. The tunes are more the trio's than ever. And even better than on Turas, a sense of lilting very Scottish ecstasy envelops the totality of the listening experience. The band is the same, still Bowden and Henderson on the case, and so suddenly the trio is completely a thing. A joy. Disciples, you'll have even more company. SG. On Edition. Out today

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''Punch to the gut like you wouldn't believe'' New Orleans as Pandemic struck hard in the birthplace of jazz

Vivid and compelling Our World series BBC short form documentary New Orleans: The Year the Music Stopped produced by Emma Supple, on the New Orleans turned upside down not long after last year's Mardi Gras when the Pandemic devastated the city and …

Published: 29 Jan 2021. Updated: 5 months.

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Vivid and compelling Our World series BBC short form documentary New Orleans: The Year the Music Stopped produced by Emma Supple, on the New Orleans turned upside down not long after last year's Mardi Gras when the Pandemic devastated the city and the reality of its ''cultural genocide'' dawned on New Orleanians, is a must-watch.

Footage from Zulu Krewe and more, interviewees who include musician and restaurant owner Sophie Lee pictured of the Three Muses on Frenchmen Street, Louisiana state senator Troy Carter of the Zulu Krewe and trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis, who himself contracted Covid as well as did his late father pianist Ellis Marsalis, give vivid accounts of what happened next once the disaster unfolded. As Senator Carter says: ''As real as it was to see the news and read the newspaper and hear people, when you started hearing about people that you know, your personal friends, it was a punch to the gut like you wouldn't believe.'' Click: to view