Ivan Blomqvist, Bror, Jazzland ***1/2

Meaning ''brother'' in English Bror is yet another album that by its outcome if not (who knows?) its intention trying and largely succeeding in rewriting the jazztronica landscape via legato dreaminess, an impressionist sensibility shaped around …

Published: 1 Mar 2023. Updated: 11 months.

Meaning ''brother'' in English Bror is yet another album that by its outcome if not (who knows?) its intention trying and largely succeeding in rewriting the jazztronica landscape via legato dreaminess, an impressionist sensibility shaped around synth and piano textures and so much more. The writing by the Swedish musician and main brain here Ivan Blomqvist is extraordinary in the way it can dovetail and morph into any number of parallel runnings whether downtempo dancefloor, long form post-Gil Evans dream jazz, subtle modalities, and on and on - ever adaptable and yet not dumbing down in the process. Tunes, pervasively haunting ('Jonas' is the most moving) are by Blomqvist and that is the main focus: he plays piano and synths and also on the record are reedist Karl Nyberg, strings and a brass section that includes trombone, trumpet and the tuba of Daniel Herskedal. Warm and reflective with that quintessential far away Nordic melancholia on tap this is not an album about swingmatism and there is nary a nod to bebop in the whole entity and yet it connects with say the way Floating Points united with Pharoah Sanders on Promises or going back further the ''futurejazz'' of Nils Petter Molvær in the 1990s on the classic, Khmer. In a sense you can feel how the seeds sown by NPM are now in full bloom. But however you frame it Bror is a vision that does not come along every day. Out on Friday - 'Jonas' is streaming.

Ivan Blomqvist photo: ivanblomqvist.com

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Caixa Cubo, Agôra, Jazz and Milk ***1/2

Under-conversation lounge hip-and-happening dress down casual with a core base of AfroBrazilian insouciance to all this, tracks are stocked with plenty of guests. Trumpeter Matthias Schriefl's contribution in a Milesian mode on 'Kismeti' and the …

Published: 1 Mar 2023. Updated: 11 months.

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Under-conversation lounge hip-and-happening dress down casual with a core base of AfroBrazilian insouciance to all this, tracks are stocked with plenty of guests. Trumpeter Matthias Schriefl's contribution in a Milesian mode on 'Kismeti' and the title track soar to the top of our repeat play rotation. Zé Leônidas' soft singing on 'Carrossel' is also very appealing. São Paulo trio Caixa Cubo (the grooving Henrique Gomide, keys; Noa Stroeter bass guitar injecting a Richard Bona type frisson to some of the more highwire passages; João Fideles, drums) enhance the album with contributions among others from singers Xenia França the already referred-to Leônidas, Eric Owusu and South African duo Bongani Givethanks & Mpho Nkuzo.

Rhodesy accompaniment doesn't overstay its welcome and gives the sound a wrap around jazz funk warmth that hints at more depth the more you listen. If you are a Gilles Peterson BBC 6 Music Saturday afternoon 3pm listener then you will feel right at home here on an album that proves you can be both credible and highly laidback as scraps of improvisation and extended vamps drift into heartfelt distant reveries. The vibrant vocalese bedecked chasing feel of homage-to-home 'Sábado' with its introductory ''hueeyyyyyy'' - akin to Rob Brydon mimicking the sound of Tom Jones coughing - that also feeds in Leônidas again is among two tracks streaming ahead of the full album to be released by splendidly monikered German label Jazz & Milk - jazz und milch, sounds that bit more preposterous, somehow even to hopelessly monoglot britischer ears and possibly even the Germans who dreamt up the daft name in the first place. Caixa Cubo, photo: press. Out on 31 March