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INCOMING

Paul Dunmall, Keith Tippett, Philip Gibbs, Pete Fairclough, Onosante ****

A spiritual jazz reissue from more than two decades ago Onosante is fully engaged ('For Lost Souls' particularly) and there is a lot of nuance in the serenity of 'Song and Dance and' the way the title is left hanging is intriguing and recalls …

Published: 20 Apr 2021. Updated: 17 days.

A spiritual jazz reissue from more than two decades ago Onosante is fully engaged ('For Lost Souls' particularly) and there is a lot of nuance in the serenity of 'Song and Dance and' the way the title is left hanging is intriguing and recalls Samuel Beckett's 1960s radio play Cascando and the sense therein of “if you could finish it… you could rest…” but can't or more to the point won't. Guitarist Philip Gibbs makes a significant contribution to the title track. Above all the album is a reminder should one at all be needed of that giant of free improvisation Keith Tippett who died last year. It's also one of the best Dunmall recordings and lest we forget, but he is often overly neglected, that the multi-instrumentalist is one of the top UK tenor players of any genre (up there at the pinnacle with the very best: Courtney Pine, Evan Parker, Denys Baptiste, Tim Garland, Shabaka Hutchings, Iain Ballamy, Trish Clowes, Binker Golding, Tori Freestone, Nubya Garcia because their playing communicates and connects deep down). An album that rewards a lot of time being spent on it. You can't claim that about every single good one necessarily out there even if you like it first off. Let's just register that Onosante has a wisdom and grace to it and is about freedom of expression and honesty via collective method, affinity, empathy, skill and sensibility. The main focus is 'For Lost Souls'. It's a major work. On 577

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The Jon Dryden Trio, Walk Away Renee ****

I used to like Urbanator, good live, fairly preposterous at times admittedly, but fair play they were a pioneering jazz/hip-hop crossover band. Led by the great violinist Michał Urbaniak (an ex-Krzysztof Komeda saxophonist who later appeared on …

Published: 17 Apr 2021. Updated: 18 days.

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I used to like Urbanator, good live, fairly preposterous at times admittedly, but fair play they were a pioneering jazz/hip-hop crossover band. Led by the great violinist Michał Urbaniak (an ex-Krzysztof Komeda saxophonist who later appeared on Miles Davis album Tutu) scratch that pastness I still like Urbanator's records a good deal. Pianist Jon Dryden was in Urbanator and here, with double bassist Chris Lightcap and drummer Vinnie Sperrazza, on the very different incredibly brightly recorded Memento Mori has come up with a gem on what is an easy going piano trio album in part. But don't hold that good naturedness against these fellas because the three create a really direct and happening cover of 'Walk Away Renee' a song that was a hit for the baroque pop band The Left Banke in the 1960s. Terry Reid covered it deliciously in a non-jazz but magical version in the 70s. Earlier best of all from a jazzhead's point of view certainly for the chord changes and more is Gabor Szabo's groovy take on the number. SG Out now.