Daily jazz blog, Marlbank

Shadowlands, Ombres, BMC ****

Shadowlands l-r: Kit Downes, Lauren Kinsella, Robin Fincker Interestingly crafted and thought through repertoire: - so striking the roads less travelled taken on the plainsong flavoured Ombres beginning with a stirring cover of Dolly and Shirley …

Published: 25 Mar 2024. Updated: 3 months.

Shadowlands-HD-1500x750

Shadowlands l-r: Kit Downes, Lauren Kinsella, Robin Fincker

Interestingly crafted and thought through repertoire: - so striking the roads less travelled taken on the plainsong flavoured Ombres beginning with a stirring cover of Dolly and Shirley Collins' Love, Death and the Lady (1970) traditional English folk classic 'Death and the Lady.'

Irish singer Lauren Kinsella digs deep and so knowingly drinking from such a well of hearty inspiration.

For saxophone/clarinet, piano/organ and voice - no drums needed - is the way the music that Shadowlands play fans out.

French saxist Robin Fincker known for his work with Vincent Courtois joins Kit Downes and Kinsella far from home recording these adventurous and largely successfully rendered interpretations at the Opus Jazz Club in Budapest in late-January last year.

Fincker, Aunt Molly Jackson material - the churchified 'Roll on Buddy' - free improv on 'Toybox' where Kinsella moves into a more experimental concatenation of an exercise, Romany singer Levi Smith's 'Georgie' heard on My Father's The King of the Gypsies in the 1990s, Molly Drake's 'Woods in May' and 'The First Day' eventually extend the folkie theme, the timbral insights from Fincker's clarinet playing carefully deployed for poor Georgie. A further generous portion of free improv on 'Ech' and another Fincker tune that forms the title track complete the selections. If you appreciated June Tabor, Iain Ballamy and Huw Warren in their acclaimed grouping heard on 2013's Quercus discover this today. But if anything Ombres is at heart far more experimental and yet you can't easily or productively generalise the nature of its impact. Better by far instead to absorb the rich vibrations of it all truly, madly, deeply - and often. The moving pleading that Kinsella conveys so well for the life of poor Georgie is a definite highlight.

Tags: Reviews

Dee C. Lee, Just Something, Acid Jazz ****

One for the Style Council fans among us particularly those ungeneric enough to, like Dee C. Lee, move on and go deeper by embracing jazz a little more. New originals from Dee who with the Modfather Paul Weller (the singer's former husband - their …

Published: 25 Mar 2024. Updated: 3 months.

Next post

One for the Style Council fans among us particularly those ungeneric enough to, like Dee C. Lee, move on and go deeper by embracing jazz a little more. New originals from Dee who with the Modfather Paul Weller (the singer's former husband - their daughter Leah also has input on Just Something) and Mick Talbot who also contributes some piano and Wurly adding to the rising swell was in the much loved 1980s band that Weller formed after The Jam. There's also strong jazz input from Michael J. McEvoy - remember McEvoy's fine Remembrance: 1955-1963 that he was involved in with The Jazz Sapiens last year? If not it's a good time to refresh the memory banks once again a few months on from release. Mike contributes some choice co-writes with Dee in the early part of the album. Right at the end of the highly relatable Just Something there's a cover of Don Blackman's 'I Love You' that Weldon Irvine Sinbad fans will for sure be made up by - we certainly are. Sunny soul drenched sounds then skilfully rendered by all concerned. Dee C. Lee, photo: cover art detail