Tom Ollendorff, Open House, Fresh Sound New Talent *****

ALBUM OF THE WEEK FOR 17-23 APRIL Time flies. It seems like yesterday but was actually two years ago hearing Tom Ollendorff live playing the Charlie Parker rarity 'Bongo Beep' during the last set of a club show in east London a tune included here …

Published: 16 Apr 2023. Updated: 13 months.

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ALBUM OF THE WEEK FOR 17-23 APRIL

Time flies. It seems like yesterday but was actually two years ago hearing Tom Ollendorff live playing the Charlie Parker rarity 'Bongo Beep' during the last set of a club show in east London a tune included here on Open House. Around then the guitarist was touring A Song For You which was a very decent debut but this is far better. Still in tow from that night are probably the most in demand progressively inclined yet steeped in the tradition stand up bassist on the UK scene right now the former WorldService Project punk jazzer Conor Chapin and drummer, the matador like superb technician Marc Michel, plus - and here's the twist and X factor - the trio are joined hands-across-the-ocean by very fine saxist Ben Wendel doing a lot of the rhapsodic stuff which moves everything here on to an even higher plane as emotionally as it does artistically. Wendel by the way has a fantastic new album out this Friday called All One on pianist Dave Stapleton's Edition label. Pick here on a studio album recorded at top studio Livingston in Hornsey is the pristine deep down the neck articulation found on 'Carnival'. But Ollendorff is good don't fret on other tunes - the rather beautiful and super hymnal 'Passing Ships' and a very at ease and masterful take on 'My Foolish Heart'. Big claim but not really that reckless, if any UK bop and beyond jazz guitarist is capable of getting anywhere close in terms of skill, dazzling technique and above all sensitivity to what's on Open House this year. Tom Ollendorff top left Conor Chaplin, Marc Michel, Ben Wendel. Photo: via Dynamic. Out on 14 May. Ollendorff tune 'Istanbul' is streaming

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Track review: Dave Storey trio, Gemelli, Clonmell Jazz Social ***1/2

The thrill isn't gone: This is very listenable to striking in its simplicity but which retains your interest as you dive further in. A tenor saxophone line from James Allsopp subliminally sends you in your private thoughts to Ornette Coleman. And …

Published: 16 Apr 2023. Updated: 13 months.

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The thrill isn't gone: This is very listenable to striking in its simplicity but which retains your interest as you dive further in. A tenor saxophone line from James Allsopp subliminally sends you in your private thoughts to Ornette Coleman. And yet here this style has neither the usual register, timbre nor the raw bluesy ache when you get over that invasive thought and stop dancing with the past to listen on its own terms which frankly is far more important. The drummer who knows about beginnings, middles and ends happens to be the name on the tin - Dave Storey - recall go on the storied Jouska that impressed immeasurably back in 2020.

Most of the tunes are Allsopp's, known for his work with Golden Age of Steam and the maverick Snack Family that also featured cult vocalist Andrew Plummer. Storey (photo: above press) who still isn't that known but really should be told Charlie Anderson of the estimable Sussex Jazz Magazine in a 2019 interview that at a jazz course in Chichester he ''met a lot of other musicians my age who were interested in jazz. Then we all went up to Middlesex University and did that. If I hadn’t gone to that college I don’t think I would have ended up in London, so that was a very important step for me. Then I had a year out and went to the Royal Academy of Music where I met James Allsopp and started playing around town a bit more.''

Conor Chaplin on bass - last heard live in January by one of the marlbank elves on fine form at the Pheasantry with erudite singer Tessa Souter, the great Billy Drummond and Katie Melua pianist Jim Watson - is quite demure here, but the key thing is with such a fine foray into the near-freeness 'Gemelli' there are three ''voices'' one song, the tumble of tom, slight tonal shifting amid a velvety softness of saxophone, fabulous jingling of sax keys from Allsopp when you get to the meat of the improvisation and gutsy emoting all part of the recipe as Allsopp - Geronimo - reaches almost to the altissimo heights. It's clear the drummer is playing to and really getting the tune and the labyrinthine melody line but this is less test tube lab baby experimentation and far more eventual toddler walking with delight for the first time. Circeo has Allsopp originals plus a version of all-time classic 'Body and Soul' that Coleman Hawkins made jazz history with in 1939 nine years after Ambrose first recorded the belovèd Johnny Green song. Available via Clonmell Jazz Social

Told and untold Storeys unfold live at the Vortex in Dalston on 3 May