Daily jazz blog, Marlbank

Louis Hayes Exactly Right! Savant ****

In a highly ageist and cruelly dismissive world where you can never underestimate the dreams and most current examples put into being of the elders - do so at your peril. On a lot of classics going way back - 6 Pieces of Silver (1957), Blowin' the …

Published: 21 Apr 2023. Updated: 15 months.

In a highly ageist and cruelly dismissive world where you can never underestimate the dreams and most current examples put into being of the elders - do so at your peril. On a lot of classics going way back - 6 Pieces of Silver (1957), Blowin' the Blues Away (1959) with Horace Silver; In San Francisco (1959) with Cannonball Adderley; Lush Life (1961) with John Coltrane; Tangerine (1975) with Dexter Gordon and so many more, drummer and NEA Jazz Master Louis Hayes, now in his mid-eighties, here is in a delicious laid back set-up with the Roses Poses band warm love tenorist Abraham Burton, vibes icon Steve Nelson, pianist David Hazeltine and the standout bassist of his generation, Dezron Douglas, on a very likeable set lit up particularly by Nelson throughout in an ingeniously put together blend stoked by Douglas' very judicious touch. It's even better than Roses Poses.

Hayes' drumming is so effortless and knowing. He reminds us of a very special night a decade ago hearing Jimmy Cobb live at Ronnie's - so we are talking the heights. So whether Hayes goes spang-a-lang, flicks the heat up (although this is not at all a frantic session) the sound of the drums is a surrogate heartbeat. Art Blakey fans go for 'Ugetsu' at the end and the version of Wayne's 'Nefertiti' with a lovely intro from Hazeltine is so tender it melts. Burton's beautiful feature on 'Theme For Ernie' speaks to the soul.

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Tim Berne, Hank Roberts, Aurora Nealand, Oceans And, Intakt ***1/2

A far softer less abrasive side to Tim Berne here on a studio album of group co-composed pieces recorded last summer. That may be a shock to those who love - and we do - the harsher, more scalding side of the alto saxophone icon's approach to jazz …

Published: 21 Apr 2023. Updated: 15 months.

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A far softer less abrasive side to Tim Berne here on a studio album of group co-composed pieces recorded last summer. That may be a shock to those who love - and we do - the harsher, more scalding side of the alto saxophone icon's approach to jazz and improvised music. Quite a shift from say the blistering Mars, 'The Latter' in its mystery seems to prep us for a journey into the unknown. And the beefy accordion sound of George band member Aurora Nealand on 'Framed' is also a curveball, as baroque as a pipe organ the mood upended by Berne when he comes in adding a whole lot more gravity. Completing the trio jazz cello legend Hank Roberts - superb last year on the very different Blue Roads - comes into his own on 'Clustard' and '10tious'. Hardly ''the tender side of Tim Berne'' but in some ways that feeling is amplified on some of the more thought provoking moments for instance in the way 'Clustard' develops as Berne reaches into his Julius Hemphill book of inspirations and comes up with something couched in his own lens. Another chapter in Berne's remarkable career as an improviser begins and this trio setting represents a meeting of minds. Out today