Olivia Murphy, 'Moonrise,' Lyte ***

Make time for a slice of persuasive, increasingly bluesy clarinet at the heart of this improvising trio. Olivia Murphy, timbrally and to a small extent aesthetically reminiscent of a Tony Coe-like approach, delivers a central instrumental line that …

Published: 11 Jul 2022. Updated: 4 months.

Make time for a slice of persuasive, increasingly bluesy clarinet at the heart of this improvising trio. Olivia Murphy, timbrally and to a small extent aesthetically reminiscent of a Tony Coe-like approach, delivers a central instrumental line that is set against Becca Wilkins' commanding wordless vocal that dips in - when Wilkins starts singing to the clarinet line - and out of being vocalese. A little piano from Wilkins' Gestalt bandmate Olly Chalk nudges in empathetically to alter the voicing in the chamber-jazz redolent lines. 'Moonrise' is Murphy's composition and is the title track of the EP of the same name out later this month. Related: Gestalt

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Ronnie Foster, Reboot, Blue Note ****

Half a century ago also on Blue Note Ronnie Foster's Two Headed Freap began a long and winding road that leads us to their door once again. Foster hasn't been holding his breath. Absent in the Blue Note catalogue for more than 30 of these years, …

Published: 10 Jul 2022. Updated: 4 months.

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Half a century ago also on Blue Note Ronnie Foster's Two Headed Freap began a long and winding road that leads us to their door once again. Foster hasn't been holding his breath.

Absent in the Blue Note catalogue for more than 30 of these years, this George Benson Breezin' (1976) jazz-funk player, an organist, keyboardist, pianist, also known for his work on 'Summer Soft' with Stevie Wonder on the classic Songs in the Key of Life (1976) returns to the mothership in fine fettle. Where there's a Was there's often an Is given Don Was' propensity to get the veterans back and on the label again when some other firms riding the amnesia express don't even like to admit jazz musicians were around however preposterously before the invention of the Internet.

Reboot is full of meaningfulness and there's some formidable organ sprinkled throughout courtesy of the Buffalo, New York State-hailing septuagenarian on the title track. A joyousness in the soloing is obvious all over this unpretentious and still seriously cool often ripplingly effective record. With Ronnie's son drummer Chris Foster and guitarist Michael O’Neill in tow you mightn't have heard of the leader in a long while. But guaranteed you will be diving headfirst à la carte into the Foster crates for even more of the player's illustrious work down the decades before too long. That's because 'Swingin'' seals the deal before you get too long going. Thereon in free wheel away to your heart's content. 'After Chicago' goes even deeper following a solemn start. And for sheer straightforward instrumentalism the moment of moments is found on 'After Conversation with Nadia.' SG

Out on Friday