Solo for Shabaka at Impulse: with shakuhachi and kora-soaked Afrikan Culture the deal's first fruits

With Afrikan Culture to be released in a fortnight saxophonist Shabaka Hutchings is to release an album under his own name simply as Shabaka for his band Sons of Kemet's label Impulse. An 8-track digital-only EP is due on 20 May with 'Black …

Published: 6 May 2022. Updated: 11 days.

With Afrikan Culture to be released in a fortnight saxophonist Shabaka Hutchings is to release an album under his own name simply as Shabaka for his band Sons of Kemet's label Impulse. An 8-track digital-only EP is due on 20 May with 'Black Meditation' streaming ahead of release. Hutchings says: “Afrikan Culture was made around the idea of meditation and what it means for me to still my own mind and accept the music which comes to the surface. It features various types of Shakuhachi flutes and a new technique of creating that I’ve been experimenting with in layering many flutes together to create a forest of sound where melodies and rhythms float in space and emerge in glimpses.” Instrumentation on the album includes shakuhachi, kora and mbira. Last year Hutchings also set up his own label Native Rebel signing artists such as Chelsea Carmichael. He's probably the biggest sax star in terms of international recognition on the UK scene since the emergence of Courtney Pine in the 1980s.

Tags: The latest jazz: right now

Latest Brit stand-out jazz star-in-the-making Emma Rawicz has an album out this week

Brit-jazz releases this year that have really resonated with us most here include James Kitchman's superb First Quartet, the eloquent new Mark Lockheart record Dreamers, Binker and Moses' latest, a big return to form and the advent of The W. Adding …

Published: 5 May 2022. Updated: 12 days.

Next post

Brit-jazz releases this year that have really resonated with us most here include James Kitchman's superb First Quartet, the eloquent new Mark Lockheart record Dreamers, Binker and Moses' latest, a big return to form and the advent of The W. Adding to these is new this week from Emma Rawicz, a hugely promising saxophonist and flautist who marlbank heard for the first time last year at a scintillating show in the Vortex. She plays hugely difficult music, very complex in its design and yet very vibrant and energetic in its execution. Rawicz has fantastic tone and flexibility in her sound, compositionally the style reminiscent of the poetic obliqueness of Wayne Shorter​. Check out 'Mantra' from the new record Incantation, above