Tierney Sutton, 'Doralice,' BFM ***

New in the 1 Love spot is Sutton and Merlaud's take on the fun Antônio Almeida and Dorival Caymmi song from the mid-1940s - 'Doralice' later included on the classic Creed Taylor produced Getz/Gilberto (1964). One of the world's greatest living …

Published: 6 Aug 2022. Updated: 3 days.

New in the 1 Love spot is Sutton and Merlaud's take on the fun Antônio Almeida and Dorival Caymmi song from the mid-1940s - 'Doralice' later included on the classic Creed Taylor produced Getz/Gilberto (1964). One of the world's greatest living jazz singers Tierney Sutton knows the alphabet of jazz vocals from A to Z. But what's more important than indexing titles or locating a place in the taxonomy of the vast standards discography is what the widely admired US singer on Paris Sessions 2 more even than sheer prodigious command of both material and command can provide. And that is rapport and space and a sense that she inhabits the songs and is a long time resident.

All these attributes are provided in quantity on this new album, getting a lot of airplay on jazz stations in the States, and which came out a few months ago. Its 2014 predecessor also involving a collaboration with guitarist Serge Merlaud was Grammy nominated. Take a deep dive today. Sutton opens the song by delivering a zestful wordless statement of the theme, then the vocalese in earnest kicks in. Merlaud is on vintage form as he replicates Sutton's vocal line. Back and forths follow in the arc of the samba before a wonderful chord at the end hangs in the air as a perfectly captured quasi-resolution. Tierney Sutton photo: Paul Ghezzo

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Kokoroko, Could We Be More, Brownswood ****

Kokoroko cover the waterfront stylistically moving beyond genre into a diasporic Afrojazz blend that journeys through highlife and Fela Kuti's innovations via West Africa to 1970s funk America parallel to the Marvin Gaye cosmos on the chant …

Published: 6 Aug 2022. Updated: 4 days.

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Kokoroko cover the waterfront stylistically moving beyond genre into a diasporic Afrojazz blend that journeys through highlife and Fela Kuti's innovations via West Africa to 1970s funk America parallel to the Marvin Gaye cosmos on the chant 'Something's Going On' and in and out of a syncretic London contemporary blend. Debuting here the eight-piece founded by trumpeter Sheila Maurice-Grey achieved word of mouth buzz before the Pandemic and then everything went on pause. Band name Kokoroko is a word from the Nigerian Urhobo language and means “be strong.”

Four tracks are extremely brief. But the main statements found dotted around the album include 'Ewà Inú' when there is time to simply nestle into the beat and Richie Seivwright's trombone solo emerges organically while Maurice-Grey oozes rectitude and an at easeness in her solo. 'Age of Ascent' has a great groove from Ayo Salawu and beyond the trombone solo the horns together act like a chorus and fulfil that role often.

Could We Be More is new in our twin albums of the year and top UK lists. Kokoroko are all about the flow and thrive on a riff-groove alchemy and not to forget ensemble play that's so vital in all great jazz. Read these here

Kokoroko play We Out Here on 25 August

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