INCOMING

INCOMING

Madeleine Peyroux Basque country festival appearance from 2005 to be issued for the 1st time

“I think I was pretty nervous, playing in such a prestigious festival in one of these daunting, historic-looking places that was so large. At the time, a venue holding 2,000 was a lot for me.” (Madeleine Peyroux) A previously unreleased Basque …

Published: 19 May 2021. Updated: 36 days.

PHOTO_CREDIT_-_YANN_ORHAN_

“I think I was pretty nervous, playing in such a prestigious festival in one of these daunting, historic-looking places that was so large. At the time, a venue holding 2,000 was a lot for me.” (Madeleine Peyroux)

A previously unreleased Basque Country festival appearance by vintage jazz singer Madeleine Peyroux is to be issued for the first time. The recording made at the Vitoria-Gasteiz jazz festival will be released to coincide with the reissuing of the singer's classic Careless Love album this summer. Of these unheard live tracks 'Don’t Wait Too Long' is newly streaming.

Originally released in 2004 the Larry Klein-produced Careless Love itself sold more than a half a million copies in the US alone within a year of release. The new live tracks date from the following year and on this 27 August double CD triple LP Craft label release appear in an edition that features new photos and liner notes by Ashley Kahn. This autumn Peyroux is also touring again and will play Careless Love in sequence for the first time. Madeleine Peyroux photo: Yann Orhan/Craft

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Nigel Price Organ Trio, Road Song ****

Westerdays. But jazz-time defies the known laws of physics soaked all over as it is in overwhelming waves of retro flavours, a backwards and forwards shuffle and suddenly it's the tunes of tomorrow no matter how faithfully rendered or not they …

Published: 18 May 2021. Updated: 37 days.

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Westerdays. But jazz-time defies the known laws of physics soaked all over as it is in overwhelming waves of retro flavours, a backwards and forwards shuffle and suddenly it's the tunes of tomorrow no matter how faithfully rendered or not they again somehow become in overlapping cycles. As we all know or should there is nothing new under the sun and some things do not date if ending up in the right hands. Better believe it. And yet while ''faithfully yours'' could be a subtitle here or a sticker on a battered suitcase tied up with stringy shoelaces there, yes most sincerely having heard Nigel Price a couple of times in relaxed circumstances upstairs in Ronnie's, hopefully he'll be back soon, usually heard with Andy ''Swansea'' Davies, you know a master is at work when you creep up to be near the stage, more the floor as it is there, or just stand harmlessly as close as you can without making an absolute tit of yourself. You do a quick double-take and suddenly you are walking in the night in the 1950s and a door opens and you have found yourself by the sound of it in the Missile Lounge in Naptown. More to the point Wes is on.

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Nigel Price in an up-the-stairs-to-Bedfordshire late spot at Scott's

Lately I have been listening to a fair few classic Wes records because of Russell Oliver Stone's very fine and groovy complementary project Full House. The difference there the presence of ROS' very good vocals factored in and Mitch Dalton does the business, understatement of the day, just like Nigel here on Wes Reimagined. Fine Hammond organist Ross Stanley plays the part of Jimmy Smith best on 'Road Song' and unless insanely distracted who could resist such a stunning rendition? It's up there with Craig Handy's New Orleans-soaked treatment back in 2013 done very differently with, recalling that wildcard setting, a sousaphone. The whole experience of listening to this one track transported me back to hearing The Cat himself at Hammersmith Palais in the 1990s when the considerably-great jazz writer Richard Cook then jazz guv'nor at PolyGram, was seen beaming like a Cheshire himself, not a regular sight to often behold on his boat race, as he toured the massed ranks of the jazzhackerie sat around mainly on stools upstairs over beverages delighted at what we had just heard. That was one of the happiest jazz experiences of my life hearing Jimmy Smith and the closest I ever came to divining the spirit of Wes given how Jimmy and Wes made jazz history in their day built on massive musical chemistry. Nigel has come up with a superb tribute to a sound that still means a lot and manages to keep the wick suitably lit. The Price is right.

Wes Reimagined is released by Ubuntu on 4 June